alumni

ARC

Graduates of the MA in Art & Research Collaboration

Angela AndersonFergal BrennanMichelle Doyle

Fiona Gannon

Theo Honohan

 

Jamin KeoghChristopher MahonJoanne Reid

Vauney Strahan

The ARC programme builds upon the success of the MA in Visual Arts Practices (MAVIS) programme offered by  the Institute of Art, Design & Technology from 2004 to 2014. During its ten year history, MAVIS made a very significant contribution to the professionalisation and internationalisation of contemporary art in Ireland, with highly committed staff and students that included accomplished artists, curators and critics, as evidenced by the list of prominent MAVIS alumni.

Graduates of MAVIS, which preceded and guided the development of ARC, include Mary Cremin (Director of Void Gallery), Gavin Delahunty (curator at Dallas Museum of Art), Cleo Fagan (founder of Superprojects), Jennie Guy (founder of Art School), Georgina Jackson (Director of the Douglas Hyde Gallery), Rosie Lynch (co-founder of Nimble Spaces) and Kate Strain (Artistic Director of Graz Kunstverein).

The ARC programme builds upon the achievements of MAVIS staff and graduates and an Alumni Network has been formed to provide ongoing opportunities for dialogue and exchange between ARC and MAVIS graduates.

MAVIS Alumni (graduates of the MA in Visual Arts Practices, 2004-2014)

Abedellatif Abdeljawad
Jill Acheson
Rachael Agnew
Sinead Aldridge
Deirdre Ambrose
Abigail Amie
Debora Ando
Val Ballance
Aideen Barry
David Beattie
Tinka Bechert
Claire Behan
Angel Bellaran
Emma Betts
Stephen Blayds
Jennifer Brady
Alan-James Burns
Liz Burns
Maeve Butler
Elaine Byrne
Darren Caffrey
Diana Caramaschi
Helen Carey
Andrew Carroll
Judy Carroll-Deeley
Louise Cherry
Daniel Chester
Felicity Clear
Jessica Conway
Caroline Cowley
Mary Cremin
Mark Cullen
Sinead Curran
Aideen Darcy
Monica de Bath
Gavin Delahunty
Aoife Desmond
Caroline Doolin
Jeanette Doyle
Brian Duggan
Terrance Erraught
Cleo Fagan
Frances Fagan
Enagh Farrell
Chris Fite-Wassilak
Tom Flanagan
Aoife Flynn
Monica Flynn
Veronica Fosgren
Angela Fulcher
Fiona Fullam
Aline Gaillard
Laura Gallagher
Mark Garry
Ben Geoghegan
Carl Giffney
Rachael Gilbourne
Julie Gill-Frisby
Mark Grehan
Sandra Grozdanic
Debbie Guinnane
Jennie Guy
Sinead Halkett
Cliona Harmey
Russell Hart
Eileen Healy
Janet Healy
Sorka Healy
Kevin Holland
Michael Holly
Etaoin Holohan
Helen Hughes
Sarah Hurl
Elaine Hurley
Áine Ivers
Georgina Jackson
Jesse Jones
Laura Kelly
Simon Keogh
Donna (Kiernan) Carroll
James P. Kinsella
Colleen Lambe
Aileen Lambert
Eilís Lavelle
Joanne Laws
Colette Lewis
Chiara Liberti
Sarah Lincoln
Joyce Little
Emer Lynch
Rosie Lynch
Anne Lynott
Anna Macleod
Terence Markey
Fiona Marron
Vanessa Marsh
Jason McCaffrey
Paul McCarthy
Ailve McCormack
Denise McDonagh
Fiona McDonald
Siobhán McDonald
Nina McGowan
Dara McGrath
Patricia McKenna
Bea McMahon
Julie Merriman
Annette Moloney
Pádraic E. Moore
Anne Morgan
Megs Morley
Deirdre Morrissey
Maeve Mulrennan
Paul Murnaghan
Ciarán Murphy
Gavin Murphy
Sharon Murphy
Roisin Ni Maoilearca
Vukasin Nedeljkovic
Isabel Nolan
Joanne Ó Brien
Martina O’Brien
Beth Ó Halloran
Peter Ó Kennedy
Marguerite Ó Molloy
Sean O’Sullivan
Aoife Ó Toole
Padraig Parle
Sascha Perfect
Aisling Prior
Sue Rainsford
Paul Regan
Edel Robinson
Emma Roche
Kitty Rogers
Kevin Ryan
Jonathan Sammon
Declan Sheehan
Celine Sheridan
Linda Shevlin
Sonia Shiel
Dorothy Smith
Ronan Smith
Niamh Smyth
Deirdre Southey
Kate Strain
Barbora Svecova
Maria Tanner
Susan Thompson
Sally Timmons
Helena Tobin
Aoife Tunney
Suzannah Vaughan
Niall Walsh
Juliana Walters
Orla Whelan
Hilary Williams
Dawn Williams
Oonagh Young

Abdellatif Abdeljawad

Digital technology and the migration of people have resulted in multi cultural societies, in which traditions are perceived to be threatened. In order to visually communicate in a globalised world, cultural bridges must be built while still preserving heritage and identity. Therefore a new form of social visual communication is needed. Abdellatif, while adopting a bi-lingual and multi-cultural approach, explores a number of challenges in developing this new form of communication, including whether Arabic calligraphy/typography can visually communicate with viewers from different backgrounds and whether a balance can be found between Arabic and Western graphic design.

This research will be primarily achieved through the use of type and image and it might take different forms varying from editorial design to installation using the multi-cultural setting of Dublin.

http://abeddesign.wordpress.com/

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Rachael Agnew

Rachael Agnew was born in Dublin in 1982. She attended the Crawford College of Art, Co. Cork and received an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree in Fine Art in 2008.

Selected group exhibitions include Ballina Arts Centre, Co.Mayo, The Lab, Co.Dublin and The Dock, Co.Letrim. She has also had successful solo shows at the Custom House Studios, Co.Mayo and Signal Arts Centre, Co.Wicklow. In 2010 Rachael received the Artlinks Bursary Award. During 2011 she completed an MA in Visual Arts Practice at D.L.I.A.D.T.

Rachael is continuing her research in the fields of ontology and the paradox of creation, phenomenology, atomism and drawing. At present she is developing long term projects collaborating with organisations and institutions that have a similar philosophy to her own work. Rachael is continuing her education in Philosophy at UCD. It is Rachael’s future goal to pursue an academic and a creative PhD in order to continue to develop both dimensions of her practice.

For more information on her current projects log onto http://www.rachaelagnew.com

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Sinéad Aldridge

Born in Belfast Sinéad Aldridge studied Fine Art at Camberwell College of Art London receiving a BA Hons degree in Painting 1985 & a Masters Degree in Visual Arts Practices on the MAvis programme  at IADT Dublin 2010.  Sinead received the D.A.A.D scholarship Karlsruhe Germany in 1986.

Solo Exhibitions: unattainable/joy RHA Dublin 2010. Works & Days Sligo Art Gallery 2008. Penumbra the Dock Carrick-on-Shannon 2006. New Workat The Fenderesky Gallery Belfast 2007 & 2003. Fast Time The Model Centre Sligo 2002. The Light Sleep of Space Sligo Art Gallery 1999. The Broken Jug Arts Council Dublin 1997.

Group exhibitions include: Die Sprache ist das Haus in dem wir leben,Kunstfilmtag Künstlerverein Malkasten, Düsseldorf  2012. Accrochage 1, Gorizia Italy 2010, Wink,Wink : Anxiety of Complicity (3 hr. performance) as part of Pirate Capital at The Lab Dublin 2010, Shamelessness (performance) The Lab Dublin 2010, Occasion Fenderesky Gallery Belfast 2009, Out Of Context Contemporary Irish Painting Archeus Gallery London 2004 and Irish Contemporary Art Galleri Weinburger Copenhagen 1999.

Recipient of awards most notably Arts Council grant 2004 & 1993, Northern Ireland Film Council 1994. Sinéad has worked on residencies at Ballinglen Arts Foundation 2002, Maze Prison Belfast 1998, Artist Work Programme Irish Museum of Modern Art Dublin 1997. In 1996 she received the Íontas Prize for painting.

Her work is held in public collections of the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, National University of Ireland Galway, Ballinglen Arts Foundation, Boyle Civic Art Collection, Co Monaghan V.E.C, Mayo Co. Council, , St Louise Comprehensive College Belfast. Sinéad has taught fine art for many years and has worked as lecturer in Art Practice at the Institute of Technology Sligo . She currently is resident in Berlin.

http://worksanddays.sineadaldridge.com/


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Aideen Barry

Aideen Barry (born 1979, Cork, Ireland) is a visual artist whose work meditates on the mysteries and metaphysics which govern her interest in das Unheimliche (The Uncanny). Her work oscillates between the intensely personal to the quotidian to the exceptional, often simultaneously.  The common denominator of her work is an attempt to deal with anxiety. Barry’s means of expression are interchangeable: working in the media of performance, film, animation, drawing, sculpture and installation.

Solo projects include Catherine Clark Gallery (2012) US, Galeria Isabel Malaga (2012) Spain, The Butler Gallery (2010), Centre Cultural Irlandais (2003) Paris. Further International projects include:  Art OMI Residency ( 2013), The Headlands Centre for the Arts (2011) US, Residency at NASA Kennedy Space Centre (2008) Triumph Gallery Moscow, (2013) Russia, ARCO, Spain (2013) Catherine Clark Gallery (2012) US, The MCAC (2011) Northern Ireland, Mermaid Arts Centre( 2009) IRL,  Ard Bia Gallery(2006)IRL/DE, The Skatfell Centre, (2007) Iceland, The Crawford Municipal Gallery (2009) IRL, Project Arts Centre (2010) IRL, Temple Bar Gallery (2007) IRL, The Royal Hibernian Academy (2009, 2012 & 2014) IRL, Limerick City Gallery of Art ( 2009 & 2014),   Visual (2010) IRL, Liste Art Fair, Basel (2010) Switzerland, Mothers Tankstation (2011) Irl, The Wexner Centre (2009) US, Moderna Museet (2008) Sweden, Musée des Beaux Arts ( 2009) FRA, Louise T. Bloudin Gallery (2007) UK, Artscene Shanghai (2005) China, BAC Geneva,(2011) Switzerland, San Francisco International Animation Festival (2012) US, and Project 304 Gallery Bangkok (2007),Thailand.  Recent awards include: The COE Award ( 2004), The Arts Council of Ireland Project New Work Award( 2008, 2009, 2010), and Bursary Awards (2010 & 2012), Culture Ireland Funds (2010 & 2011),Galway County Council Award (2011), Travel and Training Award (2007, 2011), and in 2010 she was shortlisted for the AIB prize.  2014 sees the release of the artist’s publication Modern Prometheus.

Aideen lives and works in the west of Ireland.

www.aideenbarry.com

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David Beattie

David Beattie is an artist who lives and works in Dublin, Ireland. He has received a number of Arts Council bursaries, most recently 2013 and was awarded the Harpo Foundation Award in 2010. Recent solo exhibitions include Temple Bar Gallery and Studios (2011); The Mattress Factory Art Museum, Pittsburgh and Mercer Union Centre for Contemporary Visual Art, Toronto, Canada (both 2010). Beattie has been included in numerous group exhibitions including In the Line of Beauty, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2013), O Brave New World, Rubicon Projects, Brussels (2013) All Humans Do, The Model Sligo and Whitebox, New York (2012); Feedback, Galway Arts Centre (2011); Holding Together at the Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2010); La Part des Choses, Mains d’Oeuvres, Paris, and in Quiet Revolution, Hayward Touring, UK (2009).

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Tinka Bechert

“The distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”  Albert Einstein

I am exploring the tension between enlightment narratives, natural sciences and history versus the subjective construction of memory. How can we create fluid and multi-dimensional knowledge in space and time? How do we continue to make histories?  I am travelling to Egypt for an collaborative artists’ residency/ project entitled Triangulations, where I will combine my interests by walking and talking in a ‘live studio’ on the Gizah plateau with my Great-Great-Grandfathers Gizah expedition diaries as a starting point. Re-tracing historic events allows multi-dimensional histories to develop among the artifacts. This project is funded by the Arts Council of Ireland.

www.tinkabechert.com

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Angel Bellaran

Angel Bellaran (USA) is a nomadic curator & consultant who has spent over the last decade divided between New York City & Ireland pursuing her love of contemporary art.  A private advisor for interior designers and art collectors, Angel builds art collections through collaboration and dialogue, and with an engaging pedagogical approach; this experience makes her an invaluable resource to both new and established collectors. As a result of her experiences on both sides of the Atlantic, her expertise now covers a broad range of media, from painting, sculpture and photography, to works on paper and video. In addition to advising interior designers & clients on acquisitions and sales of works of art for their collections, her practice includes fine art collection management, artist representation, curatorial advisement and exhibition planning & administration.

Angel is currently exploring The San Francisco Bay Area.

www.angelbellaran.com

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Emma Betts

Throughout my study for a Bachelor of Design in Ceramics, subsequent career in ceramics as a maker and studio manager and involvement in the visual art industries, I have always been aware of friction both internal and external; between a desire to create conceptually meaningful art and a desire to work within a tradition of processes and mediums which are considered craft. I am interested in re-evaluating pre-existing notions associated with contemporary craft and its use within and relationship to visual art. I am interested in working with artists who through their practice have chosen to reject notions of craft materials and processes as an ‘inferior language’.

I am investigating the potential of craft and its meaning within contemporary visual art through a curatorial practice, which consists of research, discussions and exhibitions. Ultimately the goal of my creative practice is to raise the idea that all the elements of craft – the powerful aesthetic, consciousness of materiality, form and texture can be utilized to create relevant contemporary visual art.

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Jennifer Brady

Jenny Brady works with the moving image to explore ideas around speech, translation and the nature of communication. She completed an M.A in Visual Arts Practices, IADT in 2010 and recent presentations include Videonale 15, (Kunstmuseum Bonn, 2015), Roadkill (IMMA, 2015), Pallas Periodical Review #4 (Pallas Projects / Ormston House, 2014), Wade-In curated by Chris Clarke (Eastern Edge Gallery / Lewis Glucksman gallery, 2014), EVA International 2014 curated by Bassam El Baroni, Images Festival 2014 (Toronto), Futures ’13 (RHA), TULCA Golden Mountain (2013) curated by Valerie Connor and Make-Shift (Talbot Rice Gallery, 2013) curated by Modern Edinburgh Film School. Brady is co-curator of PLASTIK Festival of Artists’ Moving Image and recent awards include Visual Arts Bursary Award (2014) and Arts Council Project Award (2013). Her work features in the Arts Council collection.

http://jennifer-brady.com/

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Liz Burns

Liz is interested in developing aspects of her curatorial practice within her current role for an art institution. She is currently exploring the multiple roles of the curator, with a focus on  discursive curatorial strategies. This inquiry has involved developing critique around aspects of socially engaged and collaborative arts practices. Site specific, context specific and public art curatorial projects are of interest to her, particularly those which explore relationships to places, publics and communities. Contributor to Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Elaine Byrne

Through photography, my work attempts to reformulate the perceptions attached to urban affluent areas over time. It is an investigation into the inner state and how the psyche could be built on many layers of identities. My work also explores multiple personalities, as a reality within the self, rather than a disorder. I am questioning the notion of the ‘self’ and the role of the ‘artist self’ over time.

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Diana Caramaschi

Diana Caramaschi has been practicing as a visual artist and exhibiting in Ireland since 2002 on completion of her BA at the National College of Art and Design. Her practice centres on video installations, photography and drawings. Diana completed her MA in Visual Art Practices in 2007 and is currently working on a new body of work that explores her theory of ‘ The Third Language’. This concept proposes the simultaneous experience of two concepts or ideas in order to explore the relationship and interaction between the unconscious and the consciousness in popular culture. Diana’s practice involves ongoing research with the aim of formulating theories of visual expression and visual reception within popular culture.

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Helen Carey

Drawing on her work on Irish and international visual arts culture in Ireland, Britain and France, Helen’s research is in the devising and analysis of international exhibitions and discussion arenas, with particular emphasis on public access and commemoration of historical events.

A manifestation of this research is the curation of an exhibition in Dublin in 2013 commemorating the Dublin Lockout 1913, with accompanying forums for discussion and exchange, the initial stages of which are enabled through a Projects Funding Award from the Arts Council of Ireland. The Exhibition’s visual arts commissioning agenda will be historic state commemorations, independence, civil war and other points of assembly for national reflection. The exhibition will explore complex cultural identity through visual art manifestations and interventions, to be placed and be readable in Dublin City.

Contributed to Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Andrew Caroll

Andrew Carroll studied on the BA in Architecture at DIT Bolton St, as well as completing a diploma in Interior Design from the University of Wales. He completed a BA and MA in Visual Arts Practice, both at IADT Dun Laoghaire, by 2010. He has shown work in numerous exhibitions, for instance Idionumina in Graignamanagh, Co. Kilkenny in 2012, curated by Maria Tanner and Deirdre Southey, as well as at the Royal Hibernian Academy Summer Exhibition on more than one occasion.

Carroll’s practice is most concerned with what makes meaning in Visual Art. Through simultaneous translations and tracings of  sensory perception, or again of ‘non-objective’ aspects of  painting, such as emotion (as well as of myriad other functions and registers of the artist-subject) Carroll’s practice explores how meaning may be mediated or negotiated by the artist.

In the aspect of his practice that is based in sensory perception, Carroll sees his work as a continuation of the Impressionist project, which he judges to be the most important precursor for the fundamental changes that took place in early 20th Century art; he demonstrates that it is still possible to unfold expanded versions of the original concept, paradoxically incorporating and being framed by other aspects of subjectivity, at each turn.

www.andrewcarrollsart.blogspot.com


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Judy Carroll Deeley

Judy Carroll Deeley achieved a BA Hons. in Fine Art (Painting) from The National College of Art and Design, Dublin, 2008, and an MA Hons. in Visual Art Practices from the Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Co. Dublin, 2010.

Her paintings featured in Three Degrees of Painting, curated by Carissa Farrell, Solstice Arts Centre, Navan, Co. Meath, in November 2013. This was a group show in response to an open call and will also feature artists Jennifer Trouton and Susan Connolly.

Her first solo show Pockets of Enchantment; Interiors on the Seafront, Bray, Co. Wicklow, was curated by the artist and curator, Patricia McKenna, in Pallas Contemporary Projects’ Summer Programme, July 2011.

Group shows include Catalyst Arts’ Summer Show 2013, ‘Level’, Dunamaise Arts Centre, 2012 curated by Jock Nichols; Birr Arts Festival Open Submission 2012 curated by Joe Dunne, RHA; the Five Lamps Arts Festival 2011 curated by James Hanley, RHA; Bizarre Bazaar, Pallas Contemporary Projects, 2010; Public Gesture – Pirate Capital, MA Group Show, The Lab, 2010; and The Claremorris Open, 2009 curated by Tom Morton of the Hayward Galleries Project Space, London.

Residency: Belmont Mill Artists’ Studios Residency for June, July and August, 2012.

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Louise Cherry

Ordinary lives, relationships and the seminal moments defining them are major themes in Louise Cherry’s work. Louise is currently exploring the challenges and possibilities of a process led practice; the uncertainty of the process coupled with the potential of an evolving process, guiding the decision making. Investigating the interplay between photography, video, text, interview and sculpture, Louise is attempting to subvert the formal expectations of photography image making and presentation. Louise completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Daniel Chester

Daniel Chester’s practice investigates issues that look at contemporary Ireland within the framework of social, political and economic conditions. Through the use of drawings, painting, video and photography Chester aims to question the abuse of the power within contemporary Ireland and how this has had a dramatic effect on the Irish psyche, landscape ,confidence and economic future.

“The form and elements of my artwork, as well as its methods and processes, underlie an inherent subtext that suggests a history of memory as defined through the concepts and actualities of both current and historic events.”

Daniel Chester is a visual artist living and working in County Leitrim. He has completed a Master in Visual Arts Practices through the college of Art and Design Dunlaoghaire. He has recently exhibited in the shows” Corporate Republic”Leitrim Sculpture Centre, “White noise” Studio six, Temple Bar Galleries and “Public Gesture” The Lab exhibition space, Dublin.

http://www.danielchesterartist.com/

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Felicity Clear

Born and currently based in Dublin, Felicity Clear works in a variety of media that includes drawing, painting, photography and silkscreen. In her most recent work, Clear has been looking at different kinds of urban spaces. These new large scale drawings and paintings are ideas of alternative ways of looking at existing spaces or of dreaming up ways things might be or become. As drawings of idealized planning that knows its not going to work, there is an attempt to tease out more general questions of aspiration and failure, a messing up of the seemingly transparent.

She has exhibited widely with solo exhibitions at the Rubicon Gallery in Dublin and, in curated group shows in UK, Belgium, and Italy as well as Ireland. Recent projects include; ‘10,000 to 50’ at the Irish Museum Of Modern Art and Solo Exhibitions at the Lab, Dublin and at Galway Arts Centre, Tulca 07. Forthcoming shows in 2008 include ‘There, not There’ Crawford Gallery, Cork and a solo exhibition at Mermaid Arts Centre, Bray Co Wicklow. Further information at www.rubicongallery.ie.

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Jessica Conway

Jessica Conway is an audio-visual artist based in Dublin.  Working with sound, text and moving image her work explores language usage, narrative and voice. Curious of the ways in which sounds get harnessed through language particular attention is paid to the gestural  – often creating spaces where the absurd meets the logical or where the sensuality of sound is fighting or floating away from its semantic content.  Syntactical arrangements and sequences such as the sentence, numerical ordering, the alphabet and the mediating framework of the artwork itself are often played with.  Recent/upcoming exhibitions include Tulca Festival Of Visual Arts, Galway, 2013, (((O))), Dublin, 2013, Temporary Measures, 33 Mill Street, Dublin, 2013, Repetition, The Cross Gallery, Dublin, 2013, None Went Mad None Ran Away, The Rubicon Gallery, Dublin, 2012.

www.jessicaconway.net

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Caroline Cowley

Caroline’s area of enquiry is to contextualise the role of Public Arts Co-Coordinator within current national and international public art practices, researching models of curation in relation to both gallery space and “site” in order to develop a model of best practice and a personal curatorial direction for all future commissioning. Throughout this research, consideration will be given to how the dialogue between artist and commissioner effects project output, and through a self-reflexive process the goal is to develop a deep knowledge and understanding of the diverse ways in which individual artists work. Caroline completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Mary Cremin

Mary Cremin is a curator based in Dublin. She holds a degree in Art History and geography from University College Cork and graduated with a Masters in Visual Art Practices from the Institute of Art and Design, Dublin in 2007. She is currently the Assistant Director of the Green on Red Gallery and has curated independent projects such as Sheltering Daydreams, New York (2007) as part of House Projects, Eoin McHugh: Drawings, Dublin (2007), From Where I Stand (Cork) 2006. She also received the Art Trail Curator award in 2006.  In autumn, 2008 she will curate an exhibition in Pallas Contemporary Projects, Dublin. She is a board member of Art Trail, Cork and This is Not A Shop, Dublin.

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Mark Cullen

Change, contingency, flux…

Mark Cullen makes art that offers us a space to consider our relationship to objects, forms and the environment around us. He asks that we make time to consider our relationship to them. In parallel to art-making he instigates situations where art can be made and experienced. These have taken the forms of extended collaborative interventions in social housing projects, and exhibitions in both art museums and non arts spaces in the city.

Mark Cullen was born in Dublin in 1972 and works with various media.

Works include MAIM XI for Irish Museum of Modern Art, Temporary Portable Reservoirs at The Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery, Dublin,Cosmic Annihilator, an installation at Pallas Heights and Open EV+A (curated by Dan Cameron 2005) at Limerick City Gallery, In 1995 with Brian Duggan he was the co-founding partner of Pallas Studios, Dublin. Pallas through their various guises and programmes have been key exponents of experimental art practice in Dublin.
www.pallasprojects.org
www.pallasheights.org
www.pallasstudios.org

Cullen curated Straylight for Darklight Digital Film Festival 1999-2004, and has co-curated Offside for Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane.

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Sinead Curran

My practice primarily involves working with video and photography, and engages with social concerns and the question of idealism. Through video, historical social situations are reconstructed with the intention of testing the cultural presence of the exhibition space against the social concerns addressed. My work is influenced by theatre and documentary film and it incorporates techniques derived from recent cinema.

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Monica de Bath

Monica de Bath lives and works in Ireland between the English speaking area and the Irish speaking area (The Gaeltacht). She studied painting at the National College of Art and Design, Dublin and has an M.A. in Visual Arts Practices from the Institute of Art and Design and Technology, Dun Laoghaire. Amongst the awards she has received are Arts Award 2013, Publication Award and Residency Award 2012 from Kildare County Council, Research Award 2009 and Commission Award 2007 from The Arts Council of Ireland.

Recent Solo exhibitions include Public Access Gallery, Co. Offaly 2013, PLOT / CEAPACH, Ballina Arts Centre and PLOT / CEAPACH, Áras Inis Gluaire, Belmullet. 2012.

Selected shows 2010 -2013 include Country Arts South Australia Visual Arts Touring Programme, Australia, Collective Contemporary Art, RDS, Dublin, Public Gesture at THE LAB, Dublin and Court House, Ennistymon. Co. Clare. Her work is in public and private collections.

Ground Up Artists Collective

monicadebath@eircom.net

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Aoife Desmond

Aoife Desmond is an interdisciplinary artist who works with drawing, gardening, installation, performance, photography and most recently film. During her recent residency with the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris (2007) she developed a new Super 8 and slide projection piece ‘Museum of Nature’ and she is currently working on a new Super 8 and slide projection piece for Blackrock Park commissioned by Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council as part of the Concourse Offsite Programme 2008. She is also working on a collaborative book project entitled ‘Ex-Situ’ with writer Sinead Halkett and designer Robin Watkins and on a collaborative film, performance and installation project, entitled ‘Trespass’, with artist Seoidin O’Sullivan. Both projects are funded by the Arts Council Project Award Scheme. She is a graduate of MA Visual Arts Practices IADT (2005).

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Caroline Doolin

Caroline Doolin is a visual artist working in video, writing and sculpture. Her work explores the mediation of geographical space within the context of contemporary, academic and industry exploration. Doolin completed an M.A. in Visual Arts Practices, IADT, Dun Laoghaire (2013) and a B.A. Fine Art, Dublin Institute of Technology (2009). She will commence a studio residency at Fire Station Artist’s Studios in 2015 and has previously undertaken residencies at Fennelly’s, Callan (2014) The Guesthouse, Cork (2013) and Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2012 – 2013). Solo exhibitions include: ‘mirror source | ghost pulse’, AbhainnRi Festival, Kilkenny (2014) and ‘These Liquid Brinks, The Guesthouse’, Cork (2013). Selected group exhibitions and events include: Logan Art Gallery, Australia (2015) Foaming at the Mouth, Dublin (2014,) LUX 3-minute works, Trinity Laban, London (2014), At the level of entity, The Cube, The LAB, Dublin (2013) and The Founding Phant, Ormston House, Limerick (2013). Doolin was recently awarded an Arts Council of Ireland Project Award (2014).

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Jeanette Doyle

Jeanette Doyle was born in Dublin and lives in Ireland. Her practice is primarily concerned with the interrogation of a variety of stances and modes of production. In recent years there has been a concentration on the painted image and its relationship to both lens-based and digital technologies. In previous years Doyle’s work has been exhibited at Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane; The Crawford Municipal Art Gallery, Cork; Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris; Museum of Modern Art, Croatia; Brisbane Institute of Modern Art; Australian Centre for Contemporary Art; the ICA and Studio Voltaire, London. During 2007 Jeanette Doyle has shown new work at: ‘Nine International Artists’ Location One, New York; ‘Places’ Luxe Gallery, New York; Y Gallery, New York; at “SURGE” 798 Art Festival, Beijing and ‘Dream Palace’ the inaugural show at A-SPACE, main exhibition hall of 1ARTBASE, Beijing; PS1 MOMA Contemporary Art Centre, New York and ‘EDGE’, Kochi Museum of Art, Japan. In 2007 Doyle also initiated a collaborative project with curator Sara Reisman, entitled ‘When Art (or In What Regard)’ which exists as a blog and was available as a printed publication at FLOAT Socrates Sculpture Park, New York. Solo exhibitions of Jeanette Doyle’s work have been held for example at Location One, New York; the Nordic Institute for Contemporary Art, Helsinki; Temple Bar Gallery, Dublin; Limerick City Gallery of Art; City Arts Centre, Dublin and and Fenderesky Gallery, Belfast.Current and upcoming shows include ‘Art in the Life World’ Dublin (curated by Aisling Prior for Breaking Ground), ‘Critical Mass’ HYCAC huang yan contemporary art center, Beijing (curated by the:artist:network, New York), ‘The Aesthetics of Terror’ at the Chelsea Art Museum, New York and solo exhibitions at mother’s tankstation, Dublin and Joey Chang Gallery, 798 Beijing.

 

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Brian Duggan

Brian Duggan lives and works in Dublin (born 1971). His work is included in the permanent collections of the Hugh Lane Gallery, the OPW national collection and the Irish Museum of Modern Art.

He has undertaken residencies in ISCP New York, IMMA, CCI Paris, Project 304 Bangkok and ChangMai Thailand. His recent solo exhibitions include: We like it up here, it’s windy, really nice, ISCP New York 2013. They Have Tried Everything to Keep Us From Riding…but in the end we always win, Limerick City Gallery, 2012; Everything Can Be Done, In Principle, Visual, Carlow, 2012; Three Lives, RUARED, Dublin, 2012, and It’s Too Late Now, The Process Room, Irish Museum of Modern Art, 2011.

His selected group exhibitions include A Terrible Beauty, Art Crisis, Change, Dublin Contemporary, 2011; Supernomal, Braziers UK, 2011; SUB:URBAN, Rotterdam, 2009 andI’m Always Touched By Your Presence, Dear., Irish Museum of Modern Art, 2007-2008. Upcoming projects in 2013 include One foot in the real world, Irish Museum of Modern Art and a digital film with John Hurt, the Last day Diary, based on the diary of Nate Champion from 1892.

www.brianduggan.net

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Terrance Erraught

An ongoing line of research has been the existing association and influence within my work to the era of vaudeville, which utilises humour, creativity and the absurd to form social commentary. I use these weapons in an attempt to create works on the verge of ‘entertaining’.

An interest exists with the relationship of the body and object, with both being as important a component as the other. Often there is a cross over of my installations as being considered ‘live performances’ and vice versa, where there is a human element used within the work. These installations and live events are in themselves sculptural in their existence.

http://terenceerraught.com

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Cleo Fagan

Cleo Fagan is a curator based in Dublin. She is interested in work that shrinks the distance between audience and artwork and makes the audience a participant in the work. The idea of art as a gift is one that occupies her practice: a gift that potentially invites thought, questioning, a sense of vitality, possibility and perhaps empowerment in those that feel invited to openly encounter it. Outside of a small art fluent audience she questions how receptive the public is to this gift.

Recently, these central motivations involving audience expansion and the consideration of notions of self-actualisation have fused to result in her work with Mobile Art School – an evolving organisation simultaneously devising a path between contemporary art practitioners and the educational system and creating space for alternative modes of learning. She co-founded Mobile Art School in 2011 alongside fellow MaVis graduate Jennie Guy. www.mobileartschool.org.

Previous to this she worked as an independent curator on a number of exhibitions and happenings and between 2005 and 2008 was curator of Dublin’s Stone Gallery. She has worked with the work of numerous artists including Michelle Browne, Sarah Hurl, PilviTakala, Jennie Guy, Beth O’Halloran, Bennie Reilly, Ben Readman, Louise Ward, GerdaTeljeur, Vanessa Donoso Lopez, James O’Haoda, Kevin Cosgrove, Anne Hendrick, Mark Garry, Paul Murnaghan and many others.


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Frances Fagan

I paint to express my increasing and continuous observation of my surroundings. This is communicated mostly from juxtaposed angles of architectural buildings located around the cityscapes of the manmade world. My work conveys an interest in colour relationships and the exploration of paint manipulation. The properties that can evolve from investigating these ideas are portrayed on the picture plane, either through hard edged lines or from organic-like constructs.

The examination of my surroundings focuses on the inconspicuous and overlooked details. I try to bring the non-noticed details into my work and capture the information in moments of inception or subsiding. I want to capture things so subtle and evanescent, in a moment, that the memory lies forever in my work. This ideal combined with my constant exploration of colour and paint is the basis and inspiration of my work.

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Enagh Farrell

For full information please visit my website www.enaghfarrell.com.

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Chris Fite-Wassilak

Chris Fite-Wassilak is a writer, critic, and curator based in London. He is a regular contributor to Art Monthly, Art Review, and frieze, and has also contributed to Art and Australia, Artforum.com, Art Papers, Circa, Flash Art, and Monopol. His recent publications include Gavin Murphy’s On Seeing Only Totally New Things (Royal Hibernian Academy and Irish Architecture Foundation, 2013), The Andrew Project: Shaan Tariq Hassan-Syed (FormContent and S1 Artspace, 2013) and the Serpentine Memory Marathon Catalogue (Serpentine Gallery and Koenig Books, 2013). Curatorial projects include the Hayward Touring group show ‘Quiet Revolution,’ and Dennis McNulty’s PRECAST in Blackwall, East London, working with a range of institutional spaces, commercial galleries such as Maria Stenfors, i8 Gallery, and Green on Red, and artist-run spaces such as Auto Italia South East and Studio 1.1. More information at www.growgnome.com and cfitewassilak.wordpress.com.

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Aoife Flynn

Aoife Flynn is an artist and curator. She graduated from Limerick School of Art and Design in 2008 with an Honours Degree in Fine Art and completed a Masters Degree in Visual Arts Practices with IADT Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin in 2011. She was part of an artist-led group that set up Occupy Space gallery in Limerick CIty in 2009, where she founded and edits Occupy Paper, an online contemporary art journal that runs alongside the gallery programme. Upcoming exhibitions include New Living Art IV, IMOCA(Nov 2013) and NCCA Darwin, Australia(Nov 2014).Recent exhibitions include Bellwether, LSAD, Limerick(Sept 2013)Sculpture in Context, Botanic Gardens(August 2013) New Living Art III, Irish Museum of Contemporary Art, Dublin(Nov/Dec 2012), RUA RED Winter Open Exhibition(Oct/Dec 2012), Augment, Catalyst@The Waterfront, Belfast(Aug 2012)The Wood between the Worlds, Occupy Space, Limerick (May 2012)Shoot the Tiger, PrettyVacant, Dublin (Mar 2012), and The God of Small Things, The Rubicon, Dublin (Feb 2012). Recent writing and curatorial projects include EXIT Limerick, as part of eva International 2012, curating the Visual Art exhibition at Solstice as part of the Cork Midsummer Festival(June 2012), EU-topia with Market Gallery and Studios Curatorial Award, Dublin(Jan/Feb 2013) and Just-in-Time, with MART and The LAB, Dublin(May 2013). She is also currently a member of the Galway County Council Curatorial Panel.

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Monica Flynn

Monica Flynn is an artist, writer and co-director of The Market Studios, Dublin. Following a qualification in fashion design from Limerick College of Art & Design in 1992 and three years as a self-employed designer, Monica eventually found herself in the visual arts by way of a meandering career in arts administration. Adopting an engaged research practice she employs interviews to examine local history and site. She is interested in the legibility of site and how both local and global histories intersect. Initially working in print and drawing media her practice has expanded to include audio visual installation, photography and text. Recent exhibitions include the group shows ‘Our Shared Existence’ at Ard Bia Gallery, Galway (Dec 2007) curated by Cleo Fagan and ‘The Salon Show’ at the Original Print Gallery, Dublin (Sept 2007). A 2007 graduate of MA Visual Arts Practices IADT, Monica is a contributor to Circa Online and The Visual Artists News Sheet.

For more information please visit www.monicaflynn.comhttp://themarketstudios.wordpress.org.

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Veronica Fosgren

At the core of my practice I use art as a vehicle for exploration and learning. Inspired by folk art, craft, religious iconography and popular culture, I create work using a variety of mediums such as performance, video, installation, sculpture, embroidery, costume making and painting. Context and location are important in informing and shaping the work. I am particularly interested in making work in the public domain as it offers an opportunity to test the work, to anchor it in the real world, as well as exploring ideas of identity, location and social structures.

My area of research this year is focused on ideas of beauty as well as studies of the meeting between craft and art. These explorations are seen from the vantage point of the home and studies of the self.

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Angela Fulcher

Angela Fulcher graduated from IADT Dun Laoghaire with a first class honours MA in Visual Arts Practices. She holds a BA Hons Degree in Fine Art from the Crawford College of Art and Design, Cork, and also studied History of Art and Design at the University of the Arts London Camberwell. She
 works primarily in the mediums of sculpture, installation and
collage. She currently lives and works in Ireland and has a studio at the Cork Artists Collective. Recent exhibitions include Fourth Space, the inaugural exhibition of Uillinn West Cork Arts Centre, Skibbereen, 2015; The Land of Zero, Crawford Art Gallery, Cork, 2014; The Avant Festival, Cork, 2014; Vanity Fair, Triskel Christchurch, Cork, 2013; Conjuring For Beginners, Project Arts Centre, Dublin, 2012; Crystal Cabinet, The Black Mariah, Triskel Arts Centre, Cork, 2012; A Collection of Lovers Lost Mistakes III, Dublin Contemporary Circle Programme, 2011; Hammer and Feather – Experiments in Space, Niland Gallery,
 Galway, 2011; Terminal Convention, Cork Airport, 2011; Welcome to the Neightbourhood, Askeaton Contemporary Arts, Limerick, 2010; Game-Play, Mermaid Arts Centre, Bray, 2010 and Surplus Value, Occupy-Space, Limerick, 2010.

www.angela-fulcher.com

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Fiona Fullam

Fiona Fullam’s artistic practice includes installation, video, photography and writing. She investigates the concept of ‘self’, how this concept can be perceived, limited, subjugated and how self relates to the space inhabited. She is interested in mutation, the uncanny and has been influenced by writers and thinkers such as Kafka and Derrida.  Fiona also has an interest in language and how meaning is constructed. Contributor to Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Aline Gaillard

Aline Gaillard completed a BA in History of Art at the University Pierre Mendes- France in Grenoble from 1999 to 2002 and the moved to Ireland where she worked at the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) as an intern in the collection department and then as a Mediator from 2003 to 2007. She also assisted with the short-listing of applicants to the IMMA Artist Residency Programme. As a student on the criticism pathway on the MA in Visual Art Practices (2005-2007) she published in The Internationaler, participated in the exhibition ‘Multiple’ and co-curated a screening on the theme of ‘Performing The Moving Image’ in Studio 6, Temple Bar Gallery and Studios. In October 2005, she re-created a performance of the artist Tania Bruguera at the occasion of the opening night of the IMMA exhibition The Hours: South American Art Today. She is currently travelling through South America.

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Laura Gallagher

I have consistently been concerned with the transcendental qualities of painting, with an aim to reach beyond the space that my paintings inhabit. My current research stems from a previous project which looked at the possibility of a painting having many different outcomes depending on the choices that an artist makes throughout the process of creating that work.

I am interested in how a maker interacts and moves between works. My research involves documenting this action and my intentions are to challenge our understandings and experiences of painting, test our expectations of the materials used and explore the possibility of a painting becoming an object.

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Mark Garry

Mark Garry worked primarily as a curator and writer from 1999 to 2004 and he continues to curate exhibitions that have a distinct relationship to the interests of his personal art practice. Although he uses a variety of media and mechanisms in his practice, including film making, writing papers, recording and releasing music, his primary focus is on the making of site-specific gallery installations. Returning to a full time art-making in 2003, he has had several notable international exhibition opportunities and was one of the artists that represented Ireland at the 2005 Venice Biennale. Mark is fundamentally interested in how humans navigate the world and in the subjectivity that is inherent in these navigations. He is currently working on his first museum exhibition in the USA at the Mattress Factory Art Museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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Ben Geoghegan

Ben is interested in landscape, its representation through two-dimensional picture making and its relationship with three-dimensional objects. Motivated by the process of problem solving and the dialogue inherent while finding solutions through continual investigation. Ben tests some of photography’s formal boundaries and its representation of landscape via various methods of display within traditional art allowing for solutions to evolve into many mediums. Ben completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Carl Giffney

Carl Giffney is a graduate of Irelands National College of Art and Design (NCAD) and the Irish Institute of Art, Design & Technology (IADT) holding first class honour BA and MA degrees respectively. He also studied at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, receiving a distinction, before completing his post-graduate studies in 2011.

On completing his Fine Art BA in 2007, he co-founded The Good Hatchery, an artist led initiative that he directs with Ruth Lyons and its members. The Good Hatchery is based in a 19th century stone building sourced for free through the internet. From a very remote base in the industrial bog lands of Irelands Midlands, The Good Hatchery challenges methodologies of creating and disseminating high quality contemporary artwork. Through a combination of curated projects, collaborations, free residencies and exhibitions it questions cultural relationships with place, resource and connectivity.
With his individual art making practice, Giffney has been involved in projects both internationally and in Ireland spending the majority of his time on residencies. Recent residencies have seen him work in disparate locations from St. Louis, USA to Leitrim, Ireland to Rotterdam, The Netherlands and in eclectic settings from the coal mines, to auto shops to churches. Recent solo exhibitions include PEINT at the Leitrim Sculpture centre Ireland, Partij voor Ierland, at Roodkapje Rotterdam, The Netherlands andLúcras, at Dublins Monster Truck Gallery.

In addition to his individual art making practice Giffney collaborates with a number if different artists, writers and people skilled in their fields. Collaborative and collective work features Sisyphus Americana, a 2 person collaborative exhibition at the Hoffman LeChance Gallery, St. Louis, US, Good Hatchery*, a 2 person collaborative exhibition at the NCAD gallery Dublin and Bravo Serotonin an experimental work involving 27 participants currently taking place at The Good Hatchery and along the Grand Canal.

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Rachael Gilbourne

Rachael Gilbourne is a visual arts worker living in Dublin. Currently working as Assistant Curator of Exhibitions at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Gilbourne is also an independent curator, regularly collaborating with Kate Strain under the aegis of RGKSKSRG, and is co-founder and co-ordinator of Visual Arts Workers Forum (est. 2010), as well as working on her own sporadic solo projects. Previously, she has worked with Kerlin Gallery, Dublin (2014-15); as General Manager at Black Church Print Studio, Dublin (2012-13); Exhibitions Manager at Project Arts Centre, Dublin (2012); and Assistant Curator at Project Arts Centre, Dublin (2011). She has served on the board of directors for The Market Studios, Dublin (2011-13), and is currently on the board of directors of Black Church Print Studio, Dublin (since 2014), and the Royal Hibernian Academy School Board, Dublin (since 2015). Gilbourne is an NCAD Graduate with a BFA in Sculpture and holds an MFA in Visual Arts Practices from IADT, Dublin.

http://rachaelgilbourne.blogspot.ie/


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Julie Gill-Frisby

Through photography, I strive to create images to communicate the complexity of human conditions and issues pertaining to influences in society today. The work juxtaposes ideas and emotions that are commonly experienced in our contemporary culture in an effort to encourage deeper reflection and awareness. Ordinary, mundane common spaces act as expressive vehicles for the human body and mind, therefore, I create a dialogue between humans and their intimate architectural spaces. Most recently the subject matter has centred on ‘Home’, which universally becomes a metaphor for safety, refuge and belonging, but through globalisation/misplacement becomes a transitory place and can be seen as a helpless target of a threatening unknown culminating in complex emotional and psychological issues of adaptation, isolation, and cultural identity.

Gregory Crewdson’s gritty surrealistic cinematic compositions, the brooding questioning paintings of Edward Hopper and the interiors of 17th Century Dutch painters are influential in the staging and translation of my work, which will continue to explore the concept of identity within a place and connections to our roots.

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Mark Grehan

Mark Grehan is a Dublin based Artist/Curator. During his time on MAVis, his research and analysis focused on curatorial ethics and the influence of architectural ideologies on artwork and audience experience. In 2007 he curated ‘Some Kinda Monster’ (Galway Arts Centre) and ‘Momentary Truths from the Perpetual View of Extended Space’ (MAVis at Studio 6, Temple Bar Gallery and Studios).

Grehan is currently working towards a solo exhibition that will take place at Broadstone art space (May 2008) as well as developing several curatorial projects, the first of which, ‘The World, The Flesh and The Devil’, is set to take place in the summer of 2008. He holds a Masters in Art (NCAD, 2003) and achieved a distinction on the BA in Art (Sligo IT, 2001).

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Sandra Grozdanic

Sandra’s practice is concerned with both the tensions and the opportunities that exist between real built environments – the result of demand-driven practices, and architectural practices of experimentation. She is interested in the liminal spaces, social implications and contradictions that can emerge when these two practices are juxtaposed.

Working alongside artists has allowed Sandra to tap into diverse arts practices and explore alternative ways of negotiating collaborative intelligence, authorship, methods of developing alternatives, and the politics of participation.

Sandra Grozdanic received a Degree in Architecture from The University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1998 and a MA in Visual Arts Practices (Curation) from Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design & Technology in 2007.

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Jennie Guy

Jennie Guy was born in Sydney, Australia and moved to Ireland at a young age.  Her studies include a Bachelor of Arts in English & History at Trinity College Dublin and a Masters in Visual Arts Practices, IADT, Dun Laoghaire. Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

For more information please go to www.jennieguy.com

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Cliona Harmey

Cliona Harmey is an artist who works across a variety of media including video, photography, sound and the Internet. Much of her work is about the process of recording, particularly small mutable everyday phenomena. A new area of interest for her is in the development of physical viewer interfaces particularly in relation to how viewers interact with sound: she recently received an Irish Arts Council Bursary to further develop work in this area. She is currently based in Dublin and is a lecturer at The National College of Art & Design, Dublin. She has exhibited in curated shows in Ireland and internationally. In 1999-2000 she completed a one year residency at Arthouse Multimedia Centre, Dublin, which introduced her to working in the area of moving image and sound. She is also one of the founding members of Blackletter.ie an online open publishing system for artists.

For more information please visit www.clionaharmey.info and www.blackletter.ie.

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Russell Hart

Russell Hart is an artist/curator and director of economicthoughtprojects. Economicthoughtprojects is an independent curatorial organization that seeks to investigate alternative platforms for the circulation of contemporary art. Currently economicthoughtprojects has adopted the role of an independent record label to provide a platform for the work of artists, musicians, filmmakers and writers. Russell completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Eileen Healy

Background
Eileen’s professional background covers fifteen years of experience in Community Development & Adult Education in Northern Ireland, Palestine, and Australia. On returning to Ireland she began a degree in Photography through DIT, graduating in 2004.  She then undertook the  MA in Visual Arts Practice over two years part-time, focusing on art-making. Her MA work has recently been presented as a solo show in the X-PO, Kilnaboy, Co. Clare, and in various group shows in Siamsa Tire, TULCA/Galway Arts Centre, Roscommon Arts Festival, Wexford Arts Center and in Studio 6, Temple Bar Gallery and Studios.

Methodology & Development of Practice
As part of the current debate around the term ‘rural’, Eileen’s practice seeks to consider aspects of the term as a site of cultural ‘stutterings’. Researching and responding to the rural aesthetic, visuals representing farming and the rural person’s relationship to land, formed the core element of her MA investigation.  Through use of video, photography, and installation, she sought to represent ‘the rural’, as a dynamic, unstable, contested and intriguing cultural site.

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Janet Healy

My current curatorial research centres on artists who seek active civic engagement and/or participation in the realisation of their work, and the diverse forms that these interventions take. I am currently researching the work of Platform, Critical Art Ensemble, David Sherry, Hewitt & Jordon, Josh On, the exhibition ‘Risk: Creative Action in Political Culture’ curated by Ele Carpenter, and the project Your Machines, coordinated by Simon Yuill. On a broader scale I aim, through my curatorial practice, to explore the potential for shifting the use of the word ‘community’ in relation to audiences and participants. While current funding structures, and indeed many institutions, immediately want to tie art practice beyond the gallery into a form of social responsibility and structured community engagement, I would like to explore how curators and artists might start to question and unravel how notions of ‘community’ (without the political and bureaucratic red tape) can be broadened.

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Kevin Holland

My current practice is centred around the production of large-scale permanent sculpture, mainly through the “percent-for-art” schemes connected with public works. The sculpture is generally in fabricated or cast Bronze or Stainless Steel, involving a lot of time and hands-on physical crafting of the materials. Normally I would work towards a pre-destined, pre-agreed end product, but I intend during my research to explore the tangential offshoots and possibilities that I usually have to bypass. I also intend to explore areas of art that are totally new to me and to find their relevance to my art practice.

More specifically I will experiment with incorporating elements of movement, sound and humour in evolving work with references to music dance and literature. At this point my main interest is in developing Kinetic machines that produce musical noise within a thematic framework. I would also like to think that there are unforeseen possibilities that research will reveal and develop. I look forward to the opportunity that the course offers to collaborate with like-minded people involved in different fields.

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Helen Hughes

Helen Hughes makes sculpture and installation work, often developed for specific sites. Materials are important and mostly industrial. Using basic skills and know-how she attempts to unlock certain qualities from within the industrial process and the materials it produces. Helen tries to connect with a resistance that she feel prevails in everyday life, and that neuters to an extent, systems and structures of domination and insists on the impossibility of their full colonization of daily life.

Recent shows include:

For more information please visit www.helenhughes.info

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Sarah Hurl

Sarah’s research interests stem from a belief that contemporary film and video can merge realities through theatrical narratives that create psychological and emotional viewer impact.

Her work is inspired by the cinema and in particular, Silent Film, Film Noir, the complexity of the Femme Fatale and the craft of Buster Keaton. It is in these genres and characters, which rely on highly stylised physical and psychological acting, the use of imagery and shadow to convey meaning and the utilisation of visual imagery to communicate through gesture, movement and body language. She is interested in exploring cinematic impact within a critical framework, in both cinemas and galleries. As a performer, she has adopted ‘protagonist’ roles and is interested in developing this aspect of her work using the language of gesture and supporting visual accessories. Research intentions include applying traditional film techniques to her film productions, which currently integrate her photographic work and drawings. Sarah completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Elaine Hurley

The male/female dichotomy explored in Elaine’s practice is informed by a contemporary Irish viewpoint. Using real life situations and tensions between men and women as a point of departure, her focus is on the domestic as a site of confinement. Enduring physical gestures are used as metaphors for transformative psychological positions and as passive aggressive assertions of power. Her work is a social comment on the traditional representation of woman as object and on contemporary society through a representation of power playing situations.

The use of the Still and Moving image and the Loop as a representation of an irresolvable state are important components in the works. The space that lies between the still and moving image represents a tension between possibility and non-action indicating a latent possibility. These ideas of impossibility are seen as integral to the notion of equality explored in Elaine’s work. Cyclical competitive actions represent imbalances, repetition, failure and an acquisition of strength.  Elaine completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Áine Ivers

Áine Ivers is a visual artist who in 2007 participated in exhibitions and art events such as Platform 2: Dis-[re]-place in Cavan, Ireland and The International Women’s Theatre Festival, Sweden and Finland. She is currently based in Helsinki and can be contacted at aineivers@hotmail.com

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Georgina Jackson

Georgina Jackson is a curator and writer. She has previously held positions as Exhibitions Curator at Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane and project curator at the Irish Museum of Modern Art. She was a curator-in-residence at The Mattress Factory Art Museum, Pittsburgh, between 2009 and 2011 where she curated Neighbo(u)rhood (Glenn Loughran, Seamus Nolan, FerhatÖzgür, Sarah Pierce/The Metropolitan Complex, Diane Samuels, John Smith, Elisabeth Subrin, Dawn Weleski), (2011) and Nothing is impossible (Karl Burke, Rhona Byrne, Brian Griffiths, Bea McMahon, Dennis McNulty), co-curated with Mark Garry (2010).

Between 2008 and 2013 she was a research scholar at the Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media, Dublin, where she completed her PhD exploring how the exhibition has been increasingly posited as a space for the political, examining key examples such as documenta X (1997), Documenta 11 (2001/2), Making Things Public: Atmospheres of Democracy (2005), Be(com)ing Dutch (2006/8) and What Keeps Mankind Alive? 11th Istanbul Biennial (2009). She has taught at DIT and on the Art in the Contemporary World MA programme at NCAD, Dublin.

Georgina is Director of Exhibitions & Publications at Mercer Union, a centre for contemporary art, Toronto.

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jessejonespic

Jesse Jones’s film The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogany (2009) being shown at the Istanbul Biennial is featured in the art section of the Guardian.

Jesse Jones

Jesse Jones is a Dublin-based artist, with a BA in Fine Art (Sculpture) from NCAD (2002) and an MA in Visual Arts Practices from IADT (2005). Jones’s practice focuses on the embedded political and social history within everyday life. She is interested in the moments when this hidden history comes to the surface, such as the demonstration or strike, and in moments of convergence. Seeing popular culture as an expression of this collective narrative of history, her work often adopts elements such as the B movie or pop music as a site of shared memory. Jones also uses the process of restaging a sense of history within contemporary contexts. By reinterpreting these artefacts, Jones scrambles their initial cultural reference and meaning. Can a drive in cinema become a site for films that had been blacklisted in the 50’s? Can a social housing project become the site for a symphonic suite? Or a pedestrian bridge the stage for an opera?

Recent exhibitions (in 2008) include The Spectre and the Sphere, (solo show), Project Arts Centre, Dublin; 2:MOVE, Belfast Exposed, Belfast; Art In The Life World, Ballymun, Dublin. Previous projects include 12 Angry Films (2006), a public art project, in which Jones worked with an elective community of participants contacted through community networks, trade unions and activist groups. The project consisted of 9-month collaborative process of film screenings, drama workshops and film making, which resulted in a temporary drive in cinema and radio station located in Dublin’s docklands.

Forthcoming projects and exhibitions include Nought to Sixty, ICA, London (June 2008), Project | Performance, Project Arts Centre, Dublin, (June 2008). The Spectre and the Sphere (solo show), Blackwood Gallery, University of Toronto (September 2008).

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Laura Kelly

The contemporary deluge of imagery and information threatens to overwhelm meaning. Using the medium of spatial drawing, my work addresses the struggle to maintain coherence in the face of this onslaught.

Spatial drawing is a form which allows one to go beyond the frame of the sheet of paper or canvas. This re-ordering/re-framing of pictorial information alludes to the fragmentation caused by information excess. The resulting works enact information structures on the verge of collapse.

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Simon Keogh

‘Urbanism as Canvas For Perception And Transformation’

The research involves investigating and representing the limitedness of perception by using the urban landscape as a starting point. A process similar to that used in creating architecture involving photography, drawing and constructions, is transferred here.

Photographic images of external elements in the existing cityscape are analysis and cataloged using a glossary of spatial terms. Drawings, tracings and free association are then used to extract new images.  Meaning will then be layered onto these extractions to form paradigms for constructing spatial models. These models are used as a starting point to define objects which are inserted back into the cityscape via installations. These juxtaposed objects will aim to define new relationships with the fabric of the city.

Both the possibility of tactile interaction and situating the work in different public locations such as park, external wall, display board, partition and shrines, intend to both alter perceptions and make these spatial experiences more accessible. By offering the viewer alternative perspectives and showing methods of translating three dimensional spatial languages, which contain visual, aural and kinesthetic aspects, an understanding of spatiality can be made possible. These processes open up the possibility for a different perception of relationship to the urbanscape.

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James P. Kinsella

James P. Kinsella (born 1955 Waterford, Ireland) is a visual artist living and practicing in Vienna, Austria. His work centres oncreating discursive and other spaces, experimentation, audience participation and the intention to change things through his artistic activities and social practice. He investigates anthropological, psychological and social issues including sustainability in the urban/city context and post-colonial perceptions through a socially engaged practice. He constructs alternative art spaces that are discursive, atmospheric and inclusive, inviting the audience to the creative act, through discussion, participation and dialogue.   Recent Group Exhibitions/Projects: ‘das weisse WINTER haus’, Studiodasweissehau, Open studio and Socialmaterialbank project (Dec 2014); photo: vienna: werkschau, first retrospective for contemporary photography from Austria, MAK-Ausstellungshalle, Wien (Nov 2014); ‘OPEN STUDIO DAY’, Studio das weisse haus. Open studio and Socialmaterialbank project (Oct 2014); Kreativen Plattform: Creative Brunch: Presentation and Socialmaterialbank participatory project, 1050 Wien (Oct, 2015); SchöpfWerk Fest: The Socialmaterialbank project, Am SchöpfWerk, 1230 Wien (June 2014). Studio das weisse haus. Open Studio and Socialmaterialbank participatory project (Feb 2014).

www.jamespkinsella.org


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Aileen Lambert

Aileen Lambert’s practice spans video, performance and sound work, as well as participatory public art projects and her work has been presented nationally and internationally. Recent exhibitions include ‘Come and Gone’, a solo show featuring video, sound and performance in Wexford Arts Centre in January/February 2008. The Soft Edge, a public art project commissioned by Wexford County Council was launched in Jan ’08. Her work has also been presented in 7000IS, (Egilsstadir, Iceland), Anti-Festival of Contemporary Art (Kuopio, Finland), ‘Tract’ (Cornwall, England), EV+A (Limerick), Tulca (Galway), Visual Deflections (London), Castle of Imagination (Poland) and SWGC, (Newfoundland). Aileen graduated with an MA in Visual Arts Practices in January 2007 and received a Bursary from the Arts Council of Ireland in June 2007. For more information please visit www.aileenlambert.com

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Eilís Lavelle

Eilís Lavelle is a freelance curator and Gallery Manager. Previous projects include Timelines an exhibition & screening at the Mermaid Arts Centre, Bray, Co. Wicklow in October 2007. Timelines featured a diverse range of practices including drawing, painting, video, film and animation. Work by 8 Irish and International artists, animators and film makers accompanied the exhibition. The screening was co-curated by Orla Mc Hardy.

Current work includes curating a commissioning project for the Wicklow County Council (October 2008) and a context specific art trail for the Birr Vintage Week & Arts Festival (August 2008).

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Joanne Laws

Joanne is an arts writer and educator based in the west of Ireland. She has previously published reviews, reports and extended essays in: Afterimage Journal of Media, Arts and Cultural Criticism (U.S), Allotrope (N.I), Art Monthly (U.K),Art Papers (U.S),  Axis (U.K), Cabinet (U.S), Enclave Review (IRL) , Variant (U.K), and Visual Artists News Sheet (IRL), as well as Irish online publications such as Paper Visual Art Journal and Billion Online Art Review Journal. She is a member of AICA and a regular contributor to The Visual Artist’s News Sheet,  where she serves on a panel of exhibition reviewers  for the Critique section.

http://joannelaws.wordpress.com/

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Colette Lewis

How are culture, identity and sense of place being formed and informed through the global economic exchange of resources, goods and services? My research project explores these economic inter-relationships located within an Irish co-operative creamery operating in the chain of global food industries. My practice incorporates ethnographic research methods with modes of collaborative and documentary process. I am interested in the subjective nature of documentary making and through this research exploring the artist as ‘witness’ and ‘presence’ in the work.

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Chiara Liberti

Chiara Liberti received a BA in Film Studies at the University of Bologna (2007) and an MA in Visual Arts Practices (curatorial pathway) at IADT Dun Laoghaire (2011). In 2008 she curated an Irish Film Season at the Film Institute of Bologna and an Irish Animation film programme at the Future Film Festival in 2011. She has also worked as artistic consultant for the Irish Film Festa in Rome. She has written essays on film published in magazines and books and she was author of a film weekly radio show produced for an independent italian radio station.

Since 2011, Chiara works as head of programme and film research for Biografilm Festival – International Celebration of Lives (http://www.biografilm.it/2013/en) the only international event entirely committed to promote biographies and life tales, through a selection of the best biopics, documentaries and short films produced every year on an international basis.
Additionally, in 2013, Chiara has further expanded her curatorial and film research skill by taking care of the acquisitions for I Wonder Pictures, a new distribution project for international documentaries developed by Biografilm Festival. (http://www.iwonderpictures.it) I Wonder Pictures is so far succeeding in bringing to the Italian audience remarkable and awarded documentaries such as the 2013 Academy Award winner Searching for Sugar Man, The Act of Killing, The Unknown Known, Gregory Crewdson Brief Encounters, Stop the Pounding Heart and Pussy Riot a Punk Prayer among the others.

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Sarah Lincoln

Sarah Lincoln (b.1980) is an artist who makes 2D and 3D works that use paper as their principal medium. She has exhibited as part of the Dublin Fringe Festival (2006), Ard Bia, Galway (2006), Room 103 Gallery, New Zealand (2007) and ‘thisisnotashop’, Dublin, (2007). Central to Sarah’s work is the attempt to make pervasive systems visible.This is attempted through the evidencing of human work in relation to materials. Sarah’s work shifts through scale and form, yet the persistent drive to articulate what is large and beyond us remains the driving force of her practice.

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Joyce Little

Joyce is engaged in the trial and error and the process of making art. She is fascinated by texture, the smoothness of stone, dust, grain of old timber, found objects and the experimental use of various and found materials. The process of her practice is about pushing the boundaries of materials to give them new meaning and new visualization. Joyce is extending her skills to incorporate sound in her artwork.

Through their use of mixed media, Louise Bourgeois, Amselm Kiefer and Michael Raedecker inspire her practice. Joyce’s main subjects of study are the taboos of the modern woman and the exploration of life, love, sex and the perfect body with regard to gender study.

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Emer Lynch

Emer Lynch (born 1985) is an independent curator based in Dublin. Recent curatorial projects include  Foaming at the Mouth, visual art spoken word series co-curated with Tracy Hanna, Dublin and Amsterdam, 2014 – ongoing; He saw the world and was left wanting, solo exhibition by David Fagan, Siamsa Tíre, Tralee, 2015; Fathom and Span, solo exhibition by Mary-Jo Gilligan with performative lecture Layout for Broadcast Gallery and commissioned publication Scriptings#31 by Achim Lengerer, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, 2014; These Liquid Brinks, solo exhibition by Caroline Doolin, The Guesthouse, Cork, 2013; Waiting in the wings, solo exhibition by Sofie Loscher, Tactic, Cork, 2013; At the level of entity, group exhibition at The LAB’s Cube Gallery, Dublin, 2013; Eedi & Éabha, solo exhibition by Charlene McFarland, GaleriiPINK, Tallinn, 2013.

Lynch holds an MA in Visual Arts Practices from the Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Dun Laoghaire, and a Joint BA in Glass & History of Art and Design from the National College of Art and Design, Dublin. She previously completed an internship as Assistant Curator of Visual Arts at Project Arts Centre, Dublin, 2014-’15, and is currently Gallery CoOrdinator at mother’s tankstation, Dublin. In 2014, she was recipient of the Broadcast Gallery Emerging Curator Award.

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Rosie Lynch

Rosie Lynch is a curator living in Callan, Co. Kilkenny. She works collaboratively with Hollie Kearns out of a shared office at Callan Workhouse, where they are engaged in a number of projects towards developing a semi-derelict wing of the building into a new facility with shared artistic, design, research and community facilities. Upcoming work in spring 2015 includes an international conference Nimble Spaces – Ways to Live Together: New Cultures of Housing at VISUAL, Carlow; a residency with National Sculpture Factory in Cork as seasonal ‘Im/Plants’ and Workhouse Union, a year-long artistic and public programme with new artist commissions. Current and recent projects include The Pattern Exchange (2015), a group exhibition at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Dublin; Nimble Spaces (2013/14), a long-term process of collaboration between artists, architects and adults with an intellectual disability;  Forecast (2014/15), a project looking anew at five rural towns in Co. Kilkenny and Workhouse Assembly (2013), a twelve-day participative research workshop. Rosie was a co-founder of Commonage (2010 – 2014) and has been involved in a number of long-term independent curatorial projects including Unbuilding (2010) and Dig where you stand (2012).  From 2005 until 2007 she worked with Ard Bia Gallery in Galway and subsequently devised their pilot year artist-in-residence programme in Berlin. Rosie has a BA in Fine Art from NCAD and completed an MA in Visual Arts Practice from IADT in 2011.

@Rosie_Lynch / workhouseassembly.com / nimblespaces.org

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Anne Lynott

My curatorial practice is currently intertwined with my position as an organising member of Lash Back, a Dublin based feminist collective and zine. I am currently engaging with artists and galleries with a desire to affect social change and open feminist and socio-political discourse through various visual arts media as well as culture jamming, DIY publication and activism. My work seeks to strengthen and expand the feminist position in Ireland, and highlight the marginalisation of alternative perspectives and different forms of feminism around the world today. Inspired by curators and writers such as Ute Meta Bauer, Lucy Lippard and Amelia Jones, collectives and groups like Women on Waves, Riot Grrrl and The Guerrilla Girls, my current work attempts to broaden possibilities for artists in Ireland to enhance ongoing international feminist discourse. As a nation still not allowing access to safe and legal abortion, along with many other issues of inequality at the fore, I feel that artists in Ireland reflecting on these aspects of the discourse have much to offer.

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Anna Macleod

Within physical and constructed landscapes Anna Macleod’s work proposes the possibility of alternatives to the competing uses and values placed on land and its resources. In her sculptural and installation work she combines simple engineering and existing systems of rain water technology to question roles and responsibilities towards the infrastructure that underpins our existence. In the play between hi tech and low tech systems local solutions with global resonances are teased out. Water is the emotive tool used here to explore deeper concerns of access, human rights and civic duty.

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Fiona Marron

Fiona Marron is a visual artist based in Dublin. Primarily engaged in moving image work, her practice and research process relate to several interconnected social systems. She graduated with a BA in Fine Art from Dublin Institute of Technology (2009) and with an MA in Visual Arts Practice from IADT Dun Laoghaire (2013).  Solo exhibitions include ‘Co-location’ at RUA RED South Dublin Arts Centre (2013), ‘Last and First Men’ at The Joinery, Dublin (2011),  ‘As Topic and Tool’ at The Joinery (2010) and ‘For Who Knows What’ at FOUR, Dublin (2009).  Recent group exhibitions include ‘In Free Circulation’ at Mother’s Tankstation, Dublin, ‘Ingenious Showcase’ at The Drawing Project, Dun Laoghaire (2014), ‘At the level of entity’ at The LAB, Dublin (2013), ‘Portrait of Space’ at Clonlea Studios, Dublin (2011) and ‘Hidden Memories, Lost Traces’ at Sinopale: Third Sinop Biennial, Turkey (2010).

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Vanessa Marsh

Vanessa’s work is an investigation into the understanding of spatial awareness and human existence and employs visual reference to maps and navigational devices, in order to explore the subjects of topography, mapping, islands, time and history. Vanessa is particularly interested in using readymade and found objects to expand her practice away from the conventions employed within two dimensional media. Vanessa completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Paul McCarthy

My work has involved photographing the landscape and the built environment. Social and historical narratives as well as conceptual ideas dealing with form have informed the choice of subjects. The  ‘typological’ search in photography for anonymous sculpture and the works of the everyday auteur are of great relevance to the work. Though my closest antecedents are Hilla and Bernt Becher and many of the artists that studied with them, an interest in subjects that are small scale, quaint, local and disused is moving the work closer in influence to Gabriel Orozco and away from Andreas Gursky.

Experimentation with found photographs and other objects has begun to develop in my work. These new materials and methods have also brought about the possibilities of positioning images alongside original artefacts in the gallery. During this MA, I will be particularly concerned with acquiring the skills required to finish, complete and otherwise bring to closure a number of projects that I have in progress. Once this habit has been established and this aim at least partly achieved, I’d like to expand on my work examining the Irish environment through the conceptual documentary method and outlook outlined above.

At the moment I am working on completing and visually ‘up-grading’ a series of photographs of the sites of disused handball alleys around Ireland. For the next field of inquiry I have started taking visual notes on hand-made concrete structures in the rural environment. I will be taking as a further research subject the photographer August Sanders’ seventh and final categorization of photographs, entitled The Last Few People  (“Die Letzten Menschen”). This group consisted of people outside of society’s normal ‘comfort zone’ and included portraits, amongst others, of the blind. I would like to be able to identify the qualities of his work that distinguish it from later work, particularly the photographs of similar subjects by Diane Arbus.

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Ailve McCormack

My area of interest is trying to discover a fresh new way to approach exhibition design and installation. In order to do this I am going to meet with a number of curators and pose selective questions to them regarding what they have done with a particular space. Art fairs may also offer some insight into this, as some can be can be quite daring in their approach to design and installation. From meeting with artists I hope to gain an understanding of what attracts them to exhibit in particular places.

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Denise McDonagh

Denise’s area of expertise is as a printmaker and she is a co-founder of Lorg Printmakers, Galway. Her body of research is based on the idea of pattern being guided by a set of rules that are a means to construct a form. Her current body of work is engaged with the process of collaboration and the exchange of skills. Denise completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Fiona McDonald

Fiona McDonald situates her practice at the interface between art and architecture. Making site-specific architectural interventions, functional objects, works on paper and films McDonald attempts to expand our awareness of socio economic development associated with place, in particular with sites under pressure of functional, social, political, economic and physical transformation, and explores the potential inherent in alternative considerations of space, materials and economic exchange. She has a Bachelor of Architecture degree from University College Dublin and an MA in Visual Arts Practice, Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Dun Laoghaire. Since completion of MA Vis in 2011 her practice research has resulted in the production of a number of new works that have been presented in the public domain through curated exhibitions, temporary site-specific architectural interventions and public performances within Ireland, England and Canada. Most recently two of her new works created while on the Banff Research in Culture 2013 residency, Banff Centre for Creativity, Canada have been selected for the Liverpool Biennial Journal.

www.fionamcdonald.iefiona@fionamcdonald.ie

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Siobhán McDonald

Siobhán McDonald’s practice draws on making visible the invisible, by creating a tangible response to forces that are not immediately apparent. An interest in geology and seismology strongly informs the current work, allowing her to map imperceptible movements of the Earth, subtly manifesting links to both physical locations and to particular moments in time. McDonald also looks to Iceland and it’s state of flux and change, as it is constantly erasing and recreating its own history.

http://www.siobhanmcdonald.com/

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Dara McGrath

Dara McGrath is interested in exploring the transitional lives of spaces, those in-between places where architecture, landscape and the built environment often intersect, and where a dialogue – of absence rather than presence – is created. His work takes as its starting point Foucault’s observation that spaces are “saturated with qualities” and are neither lifeless nor neutral. His practice is driven by explorations of these charged, shifting entities – buildings that have come to the end of their functionality, the changing functionality of a landscape, human interruptions in the landscape – that exist in urban, rural and suburban contexts. Recent exhibitions and interventions include: In the City, Chaoyang Park (Beijing 2008), Ev+A 2008 (curated by Hou Hanru), Let’s Go (RHA, Dublin 2008), Two Minds (artist+ architect collaboration at GT Gallery, Belfast and Irish Architectural Gallery Dublin, 2007), ‘Beyond the Country’ (Lewis-Glucksman Gallery, Cork, 2007), ‘Thru Irish Eyes’, (Beijing Institute of Art & Design, 2007), Kaunas Photo Days 07, (Lithuania), Indensitat ’07, (Barcelona), E.U. Eyes on Japan, Iwate Museum of Modern Art (Japan, 2006.) ‘Boundaries’ (Uberbau Gallerie, Düsseldorf, 2005) and ‘Making Things Better’, East ‘05 (U.K.)

For more information please visit www.daramcgrath.com and www.daramcgrath.blogspot.com.

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Patricia McKenna

My work is concerned with how we shape and construct the world around us, creating meaning, politics, values, and emotions out of the physical space we inhabit. I am interested in our relationship to place, site, landscape but also how we create our own interior landscapes and how this duality finds expression and form in life and through art. One of the key elements for me in expressing this duality has been through the use of materials and site-specific work.

While the concerns and interests in my work have remained the same, having the time in MAVis to examine and explore ideas of research, narrative and theoretical ideas has impacted on my present work and approaches to site and materials. I am currently working on a public art commission for Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown County Council, which involves an ephemeral day-long intervention developed as part of a “real world” submission project in MAVis. Since leaving the course I have developed and expanded this work and I have drawn on the experience of listening to documentary filmmaker James Benning  discussing and showing his work in Documenta. This has directly influenced me in expanding my approach to documentation and rethinking the use of video in my work.

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Bea McMahon

Be a McMahon (b.Ireland 1972) received a Masters in Visual Arts Practice from Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art Design in 2007. Prior to that, she completed a primary degree in pure mathematics at Trinity College Dublin (1994) and a Masters degree in mathematical physics at University College Dublin (1997). Recent exhibitions include a two person show at the Douglas Hyde Gallery 2008, Dublin curated by Mike Nelson as part of the Curated Visual Artist Award; True Complex 2008, Void, Derry; rigor mort 2007, Basement Gallery, Drogheda, curated by Sally Timmons; Blackboxing 2007, curated by Tessa Giblin at Project Art Centre, Dublin. Solo projects include Order 2006, The Lab, Foley Street, Dublin. Upcoming Projects include a solo show at the Green on Red Gallery in September 2008. She was awarded a Visual Artist Bursary from the Arts Council of Ireland in 2005 and 2006, and in 2007 she was awarded the Curated Visual Artist Award a joint venture between the Arts Council of Ireland and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland. She is represented by the Green on Red Gallery, Dublin and her work is included in the collection of the Arts Council of Ireland.

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Julie Merriman

The act of drawing is at the centre of my practice and it reflects an interest I have in architecture, in particularly the phases of construction and demolition. I am interested in the idea of shadowing an architect’s work, in bringing a building back to the drawing board. Line is what interests my most in drawing; how it quickens, slows, stutters, reinvigorates, fades, overlaps….. Line is at the heart of all mark making; it can be utterly simple and yet incredibly complex. Drawing as a medium is not just used by artists but by many other professions; architects, engineers, scientist, cartographers, mathematicians… It’s a way of making all manner of information visible. I’d like to carry out research into the use of line by these other professions, extend my idea of ‘shadowing’ and develop my work in association with this.

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Annette Moloney

At present my curatorial research focuses on the work of the artist as curator. I am interested in the guiding principles, ethics and particular ways of operating that the artist as curator uses when initiating creative and productive dialogue with fellow practitioners. I am interested in looking within and beyond the work that I am currently engaged in – the area of public art commissioning – and examining the different ways in which one can enter into dialogue with artists. My research into this specific area will aim to examine if these contemporary curatorial practices stem from particular global models and will assess the origins of these ways of working. Along with examining the work of the artist as curator my research interests also encompass contemporary art in everyday settings, gardening and art and rural arts.

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Pádraic E. Moore

http://www.padraicmoore.com/

Pádraic E. Moore (b. 1982) is a writer, curator, and art historian. He holds a BA in History of Art and English Literature from University College Dublin (2004), an MA in Visual Art Practices from IADT, Dublin (2007), and completed CuratorLab, the postgraduate programme at Konstfack University, Stockholm (2010). Moore was a participant at the Van Eyck Academy, Maastricht in 2015.

Recent projects include: I Went to the Woods: The Artist as Wanderer, a group exhibition at Glucksman Gallery, Cork (2016); Music for Chameleons, a project for Parcours: Art Basel, (2016); Now is forever lasting constant in the mind, a project for Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, (2016); Ψ (Psi), a project for Fokidos Gallery, Athens.

Independent curatorial projects include: Hot on the Heels of Love, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2015); The Girl With The Sun In Her Head, Jan Van Eyck Academie, Maastricht (2015); A Modern Panarion, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Dublin (2014); The Temple of Psychic Youth, Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin (2013); As Above, So Below, G126, Galway (2012); Luminous Flux: Andreas Kindler von Knobloch, Oonagh Young Gallery, Dublin (2012); Conclave: Agne Raceviciute, Galleria Collicaligreggi, Catania (2012); Maradona two for four: Cullinan/Richards, The Lab, Dublin (2010); Aion Experiments, Project Arts Centre, Dublin (2010); Sunday Night: Aleana Egan, Temple Bar Gallery, Dublin (2009); Whispering Pines: Shana Moulton, Broadcast Gallery, Dublin (2009).

Co-curated projects include: Journey to the Lower World: Marcus Coates, EVA International, Limerick (2012); Periodical Review, Pallas Contemporary Projects, Dublin (2012); Vedere un oggetto, verdure la luce / To see an object, to see the light, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Guarene/Turin (2011); Nevertheless Faith is in the Air, Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2010); Invocation of My Demon Brother, Irish Film Institute, Dublin (2010).

Moore was assistant curator at Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane for several years and worked on a number of exhibitions, including Disturbance: Willie Doherty (2011); Civil Rights. Richard Hamilton/Rita Donagh (2011); A Terrible Beauty: Francis Bacon (2009); Now’s The Time (2008); Egg Fight: Yinka Shonibare (2008)

Moore has participated in several residencies including the One-to-One residency at Cove Park, Argyll and Bute (2016); 1646 project space residency, The Hague (2015); Israeli Centre for Digital Art Research Residency, Holon (2012), Young Curators Residency Programme at Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin (2011) Curatorial Studio Award at Temple Bar Gallery and Studios, Dublin (2009/10) and Pilotprojekt Gropiusstadt Residency Programme, Berlin (2007). Moore is a member of AICA (International Association of Art Critics) and IKT (International Association of Curators of Contemporary Art). He has written extensively for exhibition catalogues, websites, magazines and journals.

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Anne Morgan

My research interests are focused on the practice of non-commercial public exhibitions.  Having produced exhibitions of paintings and sculpture in a commercial gallery for some time, I am looking to determine my own curatorial identity and to develop a practice that does not become formulaic or static in style, but caters specifically to each exhibit, venue and audience in question.  Through my research I intend to explore alternative modes of curation beyond practical exhibitions to include unfamiliar methods such as dialogues with artists in order to equip myself with a fuller understanding of a wider range of contemporary artistic practices.  The role of the public and their response to different levels of mediation is also of interest to me. Through experimentation I want to develop a practice that stimulates audience participation, in place of factual mediation.

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Deirdre Morrissey

Deirdre Morrissey (b.1979) received a BA in Fine Art in 2003 from Dublin Institute of Technology and MA in Visual Art Practice (curating) from IADT in 2007. She is co founder of The Market Studios an artist led studio space in Dublin and was co executive director and visual art director of the space alongside Claire Behan from 2007 – 2013. Awarded Dublin City Council’s Emerging Curator Award in 2011, she has worked on many independent curatorial  projects and visual art initiatives. She is currently working with, and on the board of Directors of Platform Arts Belfast.

www.themarketstudios.ie

www.platformartsbelfast.com

http://www.dlrcoco.ie/arts/unfolding_narratives.htm

http://www.publicart.ie/main/directory/directory/view/what-alice-found-there/476ed30fd5a75261183ca2d5f73f2307/

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Maeve Mulrennan

I am the Visual Arts Officer for Galway Arts Centre. At the moment I am attempting to resolve the difference between how I currently operate and the way I want to operate as a curator in my job. I have carved out two shorter slots in my exhibition programme this year to work in the way I aspire to work in permanently. At present I am investigating the multiple roles and contexts of the curator, for example curators that work simultaneously at a local and international level. I am talking to curators who occupy these roles about how their curatorial objectives and strategies are realised in their practices.

In addition, I am considering my individual curatorial identity in relation to my current job role where I instigate and present exhibitions regularly. I am researching artists and curators who work in a site-specific context and also those who see the gallery space as a space for production and communication, not just a space where fully resolved work is displayed before a passive audience. At present I am examining the strategies employed by ‘Situations’ in Bristol and reading texts by Mary Jane Jacob. Alongside this sits my long-term interest in Heterotopic spaces, Utopia and ‘The Wrong Place’.

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Paul Murnaghan

Paul Murnaghan focuses on the substance of belief by exploring fragmentary points of intersection between the spiritual, scientific and psychological. He develops content through a multitude of experiments, projects and utopian quests. The results of these are often of an ethereal nature whilst others develop through moving image, sound and installation. Recent works consider an aesthetic of emphatic certainty and frequently attempts to re-inhabit thinking that has lost contemporary credibility.

Exhibitions include, ‘Melancholy in Progress’ at The Hong-Gah Museum, Taiwan, Video Killed the Radio Star at The Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin and Memorious as part of MOPE at The Kunsti Museum of Modern Art, Finland, with solo exhibitions in Estonia, Germany, United States, Finland and Ireland.

Murnaghan was an invited artist at The International Studio & Curatorial Program in New York in 2011 and a guest lecturer at The New York School of Visual Arts in 2012. He has curated numerous exhibitions and festivals throughout Ireland bringing international artists such as Chris Cunningham, Uri Tzaig and Kimio Tsuchiya. He recently curated ‘Where is the here if the here is in there, at Pallas Projects (2012) which included shooting an episode of E.S.P.T.V. by the NYC-based analogue/arts TV station.

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Ciarán Murphy

http://ciaranmurphy.ie/

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gavinmurphy

Light cares can speak but heavy ones are dumb, 2008 Hardwood, fabricated plastic, fluorescent tubes and fittings, 1.6 x 2 x 2 metres

Gavin Murphy

Gavin Murphy’s work involves an essayistic assemblage of unique fabricated elements and reclaimed materials; sourced and found objects; video, photography and text. His art practice is intertextual in nature combining the fictive and the factual, literary prose and historical characters, with a certain interest in the plastic possibilities of cinematic structures and mise en scène.

Gavin is a Dublin-based artist and curator. He is the recipient of various awards including an Arts Council Bursary Award (2008 & 2009), and residencies at Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne, and currently, Fire Station Artists’ Studios, Dublin. Recent projects include the two-part exhibition Automatic, curated with Chris Fite-Wassilak, and coordination of the premiere of Willie Doherty’s Three Potential Endings for Darklight Festival. He was co-coordinator of House Projects – a series of seven exhibitions in New York, London and Ireland, and was editor of the publication of the same name. He is co-curator of the art space Pallas Contemporary Projects.

Solo exhibitions include: Conical (Melbourne), and Institute of Contemporary Art, Newtown (Sydney) both 2009; The Lab, in 2008, and Four gallery, in 2006 (both Dublin); recent group shows include Dare to live without limits, SUB:URBAN, Rotterdam, 2009; iPodism: Cultural Promiscuity in the Age of Consumption, Tulca, Galway; Frontier with Green on Red gallery, both 2008; and he has exhibited with UK gallery Colony, in their Birmingham space and at Zoo Art Fair, London, both 2007.

More information and current projects: www.gavinmurphy.info

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Sharon Murphy

My practice is both ethnographic and self-reflexive. It examines the socio-economic impact of labour within contemporary textile production, particularly in relation to human-machinery interaction.  Primary research has taken the form of site visits to lone artisan practitioners, places of textile education and globally-linked commercial factories.

Into my research that gathers empirical information and personally-subjective accounts, I have chosen to integrate issues of alterity and the worker’s perception of the artist.  These issues have arisen while interviewing and receiving process-related tutorials from workers, as well as when I observe and record.

In occupying the role of a selective artist-apprentice, gaps between knowledge and ignorance emerge.  My practice questions how this self-reflexivity can underpin a response to industry-provoking issues that include: isolation; obsessive repetition; tensions between reflective creativity and production; and the skilling and de-skilling of labour. In response to this question I am working through discursive methods, which include performance, video, photography, audio, use of text and construction.

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Vukasin Nedeljkovic

Asylum archive, a visual representation of asylum in Ireland

http://www.asylumarchive.com/

Asylum archive is directly concerned with the reality and trauma of life as an asylum seeker. Asylum archive is based on my personal experience of being an asylum seeker and living in direct provision hostels. Asylum archive uses contemporary art language in the form of video interviews, photography, found objects, and text.

Asylum archive aims to collaborate with asylum seekers, artists, cultural workers, sociologists, human rights workers, social activists, theorists, immigration lawyers, in the process of creating a platform that deals with questions like exile and asylum, displacement, war traumas, transnational migration, economic migration, immigration policy.

Asylum archive has a tendency to reveal different issues including institutional abuse, poverty, social exclusion, racism, mental health issues, etc.

Asylum archive is researching the possibility of creating a site-specific space within one of the closed direct provision hostels. The idea is that the archive will be available for a permanent rather than a temporary period of time. The archive will have a vital visual informative and educational perspective. This is to help to establish better relations and understanding around asylum issues.

The similarity of the historic suffering of the women in the Magdalene laundries echoes the incarceration and exclusion that asylum seekers experience in Ireland today.

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Isabel Nolan

b. 1974, Dublin, Ireland.

Isabel Nolan’s practice encompasses drawings, paintings, animation, mixed media and fibreglass sculptures and most recently, embroidery and fabric compositions.

Her first one-person exhibition was at the Proposition Gallery, Belfast, in 1998 and since then she has had solo exhibitions at the Goethe Institute (2003), Project Arts Centre (2005) and Four (2005), Gallery 3 (Farmleigh) & Gallery 2, of the Douglas Hyde Gallery (2006, 2008), Kerlin Gallery, (2007) all in Dublin and in The Studio, Glasgow, as part of Glasgow International 2006.

Recent group exhibitions include Micro-narratives: tentation des petites réalités, Musée dArt moderne de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, (2008), Exploration, Highlanes Gallery, Drogheda, (2008), Economic Thought, Ard Bia, Berlin (2008), Through the Lens: New Media Art from Ireland, Beijing Art Museum of Imperial City, Beijing (2008), No Answer is also an answer, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Dublin (2007), Like Leaves, Tanya Bonakdar, New York (2007), 100 Tage 100 Videos, Kunstforeningen GL Strand, Copenhagen (2007), Lost Tongues Rediscovered, Stroom, Den Haag (2007), If I Cant Dance I Don´t Want to Be Part Of Your Revolution, De Appel, Amsterdam (2006)

She represented Ireland at the 2005 Venice Biennale in a group exhibition, ‘Ireland at Venice 2005’, which was subsequently presented at the Lewis Glucksman Gallery, Cork, in 2006. Other group exhibitions include ‘How Things Turn Out’ (2002) and ‘Tír na nÓg’ (2004), ‘10,000 to 50’ (2008) all at The Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, ‘Superbia 1 & 2’, Dublin & Cork (2003, 2005), ‘The Yugoslav Biennial for Young Artists’, Serbia-Montenegro (2004), and ‘Coalesce – With All Due Intent’, Model Art & Niland Gallery, Sligo (2004).

Nolan completed her B.A. at the N.C.A.D. in 1995 and her M.A. in 2006. Her work is represented in the collections of the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Arts Council of Ireland, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane and in various collections, public and private, in Ireland and abroad. Nolan is also the asst. producer of the fanzine ‘Feint’.

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Beth Ó Halloran

Beth Ó Halloran’s practice of late has been multi-disciplinary, combining painting and photography with site-specific installations. Recent exhibitions include her first museum based show at the Bates College Museum of Art, Maine, USA. She has also been involved in various curatorial projects since completing the MA, most recently ‘Follow the Light’ at the Stone Gallery. Her interests lie in asking questions about transitional states and the blurred borders between changing conditions which can manifest physically or metaphysically. Her investigations can range from looking at atmospheric weather conditions to often studying objects at a microscopic level. The visual results can alter between the representational and the abstract. Prior to the MA in Visual Arts Practices, she studied at the National College of Art and Design and the Glasgow School of Art.

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Marguerite Ó Molloy

Marguerite Ó Molloy is a curator and writer based in Dublin. Since 1999 she has worked Assistant Curator Collections at the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) where she has curated a number of exhibitions, organized international touring exhibitions and loans from the IMMA Collection, and coordinated innovative conservation projects and major storage moves. Her curatorial projects include: Rose Finn Kelcey: Bureau de ChangeBearings: Landscapes from the IMMA CollectionTir na nÓg: Younger Irish Artists from the IMMA CollectionEye of the StormOutdoor works from the IMMA Collection and Contemporary Drawings from the IMMA Collection. In 2005 she was co-curator of Precaution, an exhibition of work by emerging artists based in Ireland, which included a number of site-specific and ephemeral works. Marguerite was Stage Manager for Marking the Territory a season of Performance Art curated by Marina Abramovic and was Project Co-ordinator for Gerard Byrne, Ireland at Venice, 2007. In 2005 Marguerite edited the first major full colour publication on the IMMA Collection, and wrote many of the 180 texts in the book. She is editor of the publication 10,000 to 50, Contemporary Art from the Members of Business to Arts, 2008. Marguerite has a master’s degree from MA Visual Arts Practices in Dublin. She is currently curating an experimental exhibition titled What Happens Next? due to take place at IMMA in February 2009.

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Seán O Sullivan

Seán O Sullivan is a writer and curator whose research focuses on the politics and preservation of localities. He has an MA in Curating and a BA in Fine Art from IADT, Dún Laoghaire. He recently co-curated The Red Stables Summer School 2013, which took place on Bull Island and in St Anne’s Park, Dublin. Edited projects include a book on The Red Stables Summer School 2012, and a short book entitled The Wheel. He has written frequently for Paper Visual Art Journal, and developed publications with Commonage, Project Press and Mermaid Arts Centre dealing with subjects like architecture, ecology and the bonds between people and places. He is a member and director of the Black Church Print Studio, Dublin.

seanosullivan.ie

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Aoife Ó Toole

I have managed a commercial gallery space located in a theatre for the past two years. Establishing the space is an interesting endeavour, particularly when commercial versus aesthetic issues arise. I wish to experiment with the space and investigate how other non-conventional galleries work with their own idiosyncrasies. I am currently in a period of research regarding methods of selection, dialogue with artists, funding procedures and how my role as “exhibition maker” defines me and my interests outside the context of my workplace.

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Padraig Parle

My current area of interest is in the proposed Utopian urban centres, which were sold to the public during the Celtic Tiger. These imaginary urban spaces seemed to pledge social harmony and full employment however, this optimistic vision of the future – sold to the Irish public by the government and developers, failed to deliver.

The national identity of Ireland since the turn of the century was one built on economic confidence, growth and optimism. However somewhere down the line confidence turned to arrogance and boom turned to bust and our national identity is now in a period of transition.

It is my aim to investigate the vacant urban spaces, which now litter the Irish landscape and serve as monuments of a failed political system, and instead portray the bleaker reality of an urban cityscape devastated by the failings of the construction industry.

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Sascha Perfect

Sascha Perfect (Irish /New Zealand) is a performance artist, dancer and visual artist and the Founder/ Director of the Balkan Irish Arts Forum.

In 2008 she has been developing her performance practice in intensive training with Butoh Master, Tadashi Endo; Body Weather practitioner Frank Van De Ven; improvisers Julyen Hamilton, Lynn Snelling and voice artist Anne Marie Blink. She was a participant in the performance research project Pride(Superbia) with  theatre director Bojan Jablanovec from Via Negativa, (Slovenia). She was commissioned with filmmaker Luke Macmanus by RTE and the Arts Council ‘Dance on the Box’ to make the short dance film Monitor– screened as part the 2008 Dublin Dance Festival.

Her recent  solo work includes Organ City, in Smock Alley Theatre as part of the Dublin Fringe Festival 2007, at The Back Loft and at Excursions Performance Festival 2006, Limerick. Intimacy, which has been performed in Synesthesia Sat, Birr Vintage Week and Arts Festival 2007, Hotel Ballymun, TULCA Live Art Festival 2006, Galway; Reality Show with Dejan Garbos, Project Arts.

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Aisling Prior

Aisling Prior was the founding curator/director of Breaking Ground, the art commission programme in Ballymun, (01-’08), where she produced over 40 projects including Jochen Gerz “amaptocare” Jeanette Doyle “Portrayals”, Seamus Nolan “Hotel Ballymun” Adam Chodzko “Around” and work by Desperate Optimists, Andrew Kearney, Paul McKinley, Paddy Jolley and others. She curated the international exhibition and conference “Art in the Life World”. After graduating from UCD with a degree in Philosophy, she lived in Paris, where she organised a retrospective of Irish Cinema at the Centre Georges Pompidou. She was the founder of the Galway Film Centre, (’88-‘90) and the director of the Sculptors’ Society of Ireland (VAI), (’91-‘97). She holds an MA in Visual Arts Practices, IADT(’04-’05)

www.breakingground.ie

www.artinthelifeworld.com

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Paul Regan

The imagery and symbolism associated with notions of “the sacred” within religious ideologies is a current investigation within my work. Focusing primarily on the Western tradition of representation of the divine, my research also interrogates related subjects such as the psychology of personal faith, ecclesiastical insignia [iconography] and the visual form in ritual. Working with religious elements raises compelling issues with regard to faith (blind faith) and implies a crucial questioning of religious institutions impacting politics and personal artistic expression.

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Emma Roche

I am interested in the notion of hybridity within painting and particularly a crossbreed of contemporary painting with more primitive or folk-orientated practices. Rosemarie Trockel’s knitted paintings use the traditionally ‘feminine’ craft of knitting in a context of mass production and corporate symbols (wool-mark/playboy bunny/hammer and sickle). In comparison the autonomous marks/brushstrokes in my paintings attempt to revaluate the notion of traditional homespun/cottage craft. I am not concerned with overturning ‘hierarchies’ between high and low culture but have a more primary concern of a physical engagement with the medium.

The idea of deconstruction of painting and its established processes and consequent reconstruction is a curious one but also a positive one. For me the conversations surrounding the ‘death’ of painting have become tedious as a mixing of the arts, leaving no one practice in a more hegemonic state than the next, is at the foreground. These paintings aim to work against the unitary, using various approaches or borrowing from multiple practices. I will continue to research artists who interrogate the meaning of painting in a practical way e.g. Fabian Marcaccio’s ‘Paintants’ 
www.emmaroche.com

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Kitty Rogers

Kitty’s research interests currently are those surrounding the nature of motif and ornament. Her work focuses on pattern and processes of textile production, as well as the co-relations between these industries and the socio-political narratives of modernity. The familiarity of motif and pattern in respect of memory, knowledge and language is a recurring source of inquiry in her practice. Kitty completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Kevin Ryan

I am interested in critical writing as a discipline to examine art practices concerned with social inclusion and participation. What are the strategies and methodologies needed to establish a framework that will allow communities and groups to become full participants and not just spectators in public art projects? I am beginning to understand the importance of the curatorial practice as a means of enquiry into such debates, as a method of critique and a broadening out how we see and experience art. Can the exhibition space be a tool for change, a forum that allows, encourages discourse or a way of maintaining and creating barriers? My research will investigate the practicalities of writing for magazines as well as exploring practices, writings and theories around the above themes.

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Jonathan Sammon

In my work I am concerned with using the moving image to create cyclical and non linear narratives through the juxtaposition of multiple strands of contrasting and overlapping imagery and scenarios. Many of the references in my work stem from science-fiction literature, particularly the work of Philip K. Dick and Frederick Pohl. Both of these authors have, in their work, posed the question of what it is to be human and I am engaged in developing narratives which explore this universal question. I am exploring different methods of installation in the conscious effort to produce a space for the viewer to engage with my work beyond the single channel projection durational model I have until now utilised. I am currently researching the practices of Diana Thater and Jane and Louise Wilson in regards to this.

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Celine Sheridan

Celine’s practice incorporates drawing as a medium. Celine makes this work within a framework of self-analysis, which is informed by an awareness of broader social and political issues and contexts. Her current research focuses on domesticity and place. In particular she explores issues of family and home through drawings and narration. By exploring these issues, she perhaps answers questions about her identity – her identity as an artist, as a daughter, her role as a teacher and as a member of society. One of Celine’s recent projects includes a self-published artist’s book entitled ‘Build me a Studio’ 08-09.

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Linda Shevlin

Linda Shevlin is a visual artist and curator based in Co. Roscommon, Ireland.

Through a variety of media, her work explores the relationship between the built and natural environment. Combing video, installation, drawing, painting, collaboration and curating to unpack the complexities of modernity’s and industrialisation’s effects on land and socio-cultural practices.
Shevlin has participated in exhibitions and projects both nationally and internationally. In 2012 she was awarded one of two inaugural residencies under the Spark Project funded through Leitrim Arts Office & Enterprise Board in partnership with the Arts Council of Ireland. The work produced, Supernature, was recently exhibited in Galway Arts Centre. In 2011 Falling Awake, a collaborative film made with Padraig Cunningham, was selected for Tulca Festival, Galway. The piece has also been shown in Bodh Gaya, India;  Philadelphia,  USA (Centre for Emerging Artists) and Nottingham, UK (Surface Gallery). Other recent exhibitions include Circadian, Leitrim Sculpture Centre, Social Capital, The Dock, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, Relics and Ruins, Hammond Gallery, Cork and Crave, Cross Gallery, Dublin.

In 2009 Shevlin completed an MA in Visual Arts Practices through IADT and in 2010, was appointed to the Board of Directors of Visual Artists Ireland.

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Sonia Shiel

For most recent information please visit http://www.soniashiel.com/.

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Dorothy Smith

Dorothy Smith is a graduate of IADT (MA in Visual Arts Practices), NCAD (Degree Fine Art Painting) and UCD (Post Grad Diploma Arts Administration). She has exhibited widely in solo and group exhibitions in the Lab, the RHA, the Hallward Gallery, the Original Print Gallery, Dublin, The Bourne Vincent Gallery, University College Limerick, the Lavit Gallery, Cork, the RUA , the Gerard Dillon Gallery, Grafiska Sallskapet, Stockholm, the London Art Fair and the Gormley Gallery, Belfast and Dublin. She is a member of the Blackchurch Print Studio and of Visual Artists Ireland. Dorothy’s practice is concerned with the built environments in which people live and work and in particular with the construction and use of public space. Drawing is fundamental to this practice and she is an invited artist at the Life Drawing Sessions in the RHA. She has worked with many community based organisations as a manager, facilitator and teacher. Her work is in the collections of The Office of Public Works, The Irish Contemporary Arts Society, NIVAL, the New York Public Library Print Collection, AXA and private collections. She is a recipient of the Taylor Bequest Award, has participated in the Boyle Arts Festival, Eigse, the Dublin International Print Festival and Annamakerrig, Cill Rialaig and Inislacken Residencies.

http://dorothysmith.ie

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Kate Strain

Kate Strain (1983, Ireland) is an independent curator based between Dublin and Amsterdam, currently participating on de Appel Curatorial Programme. She holds an MA in Visual Arts Practice from IADT Dun Laoghaire, and a BA in History, and the History of Art and Architecture from Trinity College Dublin. Strain makes up one half of the paired curatorial practice RGKSKSRG, alongside Rachael Gilbourne, and has worked in a curatorial capacity at Project Arts Centre, Dublin, and Butler Gallery, Kilkenny. Active research projects include The Centre for Dying On Stage, currently hosted by Grazer Kunstverein, Austria; and the on-going development of On Curating Histories – a generative lecture series set to unfold in 2014.

Recent exhibitions include Whitewashing the Moon, co-curated with Tessa Giblin, Project Arts Centre, Dublin (2012); Making a Scene – Raising the Ink Flag, as part as eva International Biennial of Art, Limerick (2012); Colin Martin -The Garden, Broadcast Gallery, Dublin (2012); and Production, with Black Church Print Studio, Monstertruck Gallery, Dublin (2012).Strain serves on the board of directors for Commonage, a research, design and curatorial organisation based inCallan, Co Kilkenny; and is a member of The Good Hatchery, an artist-led initiative located in the boglands of Co Offaly.

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Barbora Svecova

Drawing on her expertise in music, puppetry animation and video, Barbora’s research explores the boundary between theatre and visual arts. Her work is conducted in a specifically theatrical environment which acts as a playground to allow an ‘event’ to unfold with the public. This involves intervention and play in as unrestricted a manner as possible, in as free an expression as possible, with the ultimate aim of enabling an exploration of ‘unintentional art’ and the possibility of a hybrid art form between visual arts and theatre. Barbora completed the MA in Visual Arts Practices in 2008.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Maria Tanner

My research is concerned with the contemporary artistic development in post Communist Eastern Europe. The direction of this enquiry focuses on open processes that work to create new layers of history and subjectivity in relation to spaces that once represented the occupation of subjectivity under communism. Through creative dynamics which are mobilising civic space this research also considers the opening out of a fluid cross-cultural exchange of ideas, which upholds the movement of agency and questions the implications of living in a globalised world where national boundaries play a diminished role.

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Sally Timmons

Sally Timmons is an artist and curator based in Dublin City. Timmons has involved herself in collaborative endeavour through various associations with artist-led groups such as, Platform in Finland and The Moore Street Lending Library in Dublin. Timmons is the founder and director of Commonplace Artists Studios in Dublin’s city centre. She has developed a number of exhibitions and projects as an independent curator including the touring exhibition and book Rigor Mort and The Temporary Collection in Castletown House Co. Kildare. Photography and visual archives are also one of her passions and she works as an educator in that field.

Curatorial projects (collaborative and independent) include:

Via (i and ii Exhibitions Dublin, 2002/2004), The Moore Street Lending Library (Exhibition/Event Dublin, 2005/6), Commonplace Projects (Commissioning Programme Dublin, ongoing since 2006), Soap Box Sessions (Artists Event Galway Arts Centre, 2007), Temporary Foray and State (Symposia and publication, Kildare Arts Services, 2007), Rigor Mort (Touring Exhibition and publication, 2007), The Temporary Collection (Exhibition, Castletown House, County Kildare 2008), Solas (Exhibition Naas general Hospital, Co Kildare 2009/10), Hopeful Structures (Exhibition in Saint Annes Park, Dublin as part of Dublin City Council’s annual curator award, 2011). Lived Lives (Assistant to artist Seamus McGuinness we undertook a process of ‘informed consent’ towards the representation of families of suicide in the visual arts, various locations in Ireland, 2006 – 2012), Commonplace Projects and Commissions (Ongoing since 2006 – 2013).

www.commonplace.ie

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Aoife Tunney

As a curator Aoife Tunney is interested in situational aesthetics as posited by Victor Burgin, where the details and context of the exhibition site play a large part in the nature of the objects made and shown there. Her practice involves collaborative and off-site exhibitions, providing alternative venues for the viewer, where the rules of representation are not gallery or museum specific. As an exhibition maker she engages in sociological and institutional critique. Her practice attempts to bring current political and social issues to the fore through her choice of site for that work. Her current project, ‘Work-in-space’ investigates human motivation and interaction and with labour, using art to intervene and challenge the state of our current work crisis and stereotypical notions of the working space.

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Suzannah Vaughan

Primarily working with the medium of sculpture and installation, my practice is influenced by constructed spaces, light and architecture. I am particularly interested in the point where imagined spaces come into existence, creating endless possibilities within that moment. Architects propose idealised spaces, some of which will never take physical form but remain a suggested alternative, constantly questioning that which exists in its place. I am interested in the potential of these transient spaces, where utopian structures can exist outside the politics of reality.

My work proposes imagined and idealised spaces and structures which exist as a stand-alone piece or as an alternative structure within an existing space. Simple minimalist forms create a phenomenological experience for the viewer and offer an alternative to the distractions of modern life, creating a moment to contemplate possibility.

Contributed to  Curatorial Session: Reader—Inquiries into Curatorial Practice.

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Niall Walsh

Manifestations of political aspirations are regularly underpinned by visual and artistic movements. I am interested in looking at representations of this phenomena in the 20th Century with a particular concentration on the use of the environment as a metaphor for political ideologies. I would like to link this research to current environmental concerns, where the environment itself has become the overriding focus of current political debate. I would like to link this to my own practice through looking at other artists who are involved in this area of expression. Researching writers who are discussing how artists are involved in this area of thought and how this process can feed into a wider interaction between local communities and artistic communities.


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Orla Whelan

Orla Whelan makes highly individual paintings that consider the exploration and representation of Subjectivity and the human condition. She has a MA in Visual Arts Practices from Institute of Art, Design & Technology, Dun Laoghaire, Dublin (2007), MA European Fine Art from Winchester School of Art, Barcelona (2001) and BA Fine Art from National College of Art & Design, Dublin (1997).

Recent Solo exhibitions include In Paint, In Teeth, In Mountains, In Stars, The LAB, (2011/12), Seeing in black, Roscommon Art Centre (2011), At the Heart of Chance, Draiocht, Blanchardstown (2008/09), We live to see each other at thisisnotashop (2007), and Outside at The Return, Goethe Instituit (2007). Group exhibitions include There, Not There at Crawford Art Gallery (2008) and Trapezium at the LAB (2008). She is a founder member of the artists collective AtHomeStudios (2013).

www.orlawhelan.com

www.athomestudios.wordpress.com

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Hilary Williams

Hilary Williams is a Dublin-based artist whose work encompassing performance, video, installation, photography and drawing is motivated by the fragility of mortality. She holds a BA in Fine Art and an MA in Visual Arts Practices and her previous exhibitions and projects include Bulk (Concourse, Dun Laoghaire 2005), ‘In Passing’ (Beyond Performance Tour, Northern Ireland 2005), ‘Excursions’ (Performance Festival, Limerick, 2008) and ‘Drawing The Line’ (Dublin Institute of Technology, 2008). She was an award winner in ‘Sculpture in Context’ (Botanic Gardens and Farmleigh Dublin, 2004) and she has participated in workshops with Nigel Rolfe (Dublin, 2005) Alaistair Mc Lennon and Brian Connolly (Dublin, 2007) and Elvera Santa Maria (Belfast, 2008). Her writing on performance has appeared in the Visual Artists Ireland Newsletter (September 2005).

Hilary’s Performance Video “Last Breath” has been screened at the Galway Arts Festival with the art group MART in July 2008, at The Black Box Art venue with Catalyst Art Gallery, Belfast on July 10th, 2008, in Tulka Live art/film/performance exhibition with a screening at live@8 Galway, curated by Aine Phillips, November 18th 2008 and at Gallerie Arts Claims Impulse on December 20th, Lubener str 5 Berlin 2008.

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Dawn Williams

Dawn Williams is a curator whose interests lie in process and construction. Currently she is working towards There, Not There (Crawford Art Gallery, July 2008); an exhibition which will feature the work of five Irish contemporary painters; Elizabeth Magill, Felicity Clear, Paul Nugent, Orla Whelan and Mark McGreevy who each explore in their work the properties of paint and photographic references to interrogate the blur between the natural and the fabricated image.

Previous curated exhibitions include Coffee-Project (2007) www.coffee-project.net, I Want to Be with You, Clive Murphy (2005) There & Back, Yuko Shiraishi (2003), and Crawford Open (2007, 2004, 2003. Dawn has also published in Visual Arts Newsletter, Exit Cork (with Static and National Sculpture Factory), Irish Tourist Board Magazine, as well as contributing selected catalogue entries.

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